Family Day Easter Egg Hunt open to the community

bt Jim Busha// Staff Writer

Volunteer State Community College is hosting Family Day Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, March 28.
The event will take place outside in the Quad and will be from 10 a.m. – noon.
The event is open to all on the Vol State campus as well as members of the community, who want to celebrate Easter with Vol State and spend some time outdoors.

“We encourage all students to invite their family and friends,” said Kathleen Long, president of the Association of Campus Events (ACE) Club. “It is a day for families to just spend time with each other, and for the community to come together, as well.”
There will be an Easter Egg Hunt

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The Egg Hunt will have two age brackets, 0-6 years old and 7-11 years old, and there will be a raffle to give away prizes.
There will also be an appearance from the Easter Bunny.
Parents are encouraged to be involved and take photos of the event.
Anyone who has questions or concerns is encouraged to contact, Tabitha Sherrell, coordinator of student activities, in the office of Student Life and Diversity Initiatives (SLDI) at tabitha.sherrell@volstate.edu.

It is your fellow classmates, teachers, and peers that help put on these events and they need your support

by Ann Roberts// Editor-in-Chief

On Tuesday, March 17, there were two events at Volunteer State Community College. One was a Humanities Matters lecture on Transcendentalist communes. Maybe 10 people attended.

There was also on that Tuesday, a Lunch and Learn event.

Nobody showed up for it.
Such low attendance to school events makes me wonder; why aren’t people coming to these things?
Either the students do not know the events are happening, they do not want to go or they have no time to.

“I seriously encourage students to go to as many events, lectures, and opportunities that Vol State hosts as possible. Too much work, effort, and money goes into trying to make the student body unified and happy, and the end result is sometimes disappointing. It is your fellow classmates, teachers, and peers that help put on these events and they need your support,” said Kathleen Long, president of Association of Campus Events (ACE).
“[SLDI] works extremely hard to provide meaningful and significant programming for the entire student body at Vol State.  The activities sponsored, especially by my office, are paid by student fees.  I would encourage students to participate in activities, especially when they are paying for it.  Outside of my office, events are planned to assist in education and furthering exploration of the mind.

“Although attendance is not mandatory, it should be a priority option to attend to see what is available for collegiate growth,” said Dr. Kenny Yarbrough, director of Student Services in SLDI.

I see plenty of people hanging out in the cafeteria everyday at every time. I know they have the time to come to events and lectures.

Do they not know that things are happening? There are flyers up and a calendar on the website and in the school newspaper. There are announcements and flyers on the bulletin boards as well as on the monitors in every building. Do they not see them?

“There is always something happening at Vol State. One thing in particular that I have enjoyed is traveling to other states for conferences and meetings.
“Last year, I went to Washington, D.C. with Dr. Yarbrough for the ASAAC conference, where I met with the United States Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, and spoke with him about Vol State.

“Of course, the trip was wonderful, but I didn’t have to worry about the financial obligation to attend.
“Our student activity fee footed the bill for that once in a lifetime experience for me, and I am eternally grateful.
“I encourage everyone to take part in these events, and look into trips that are available. These trips are available to all students, and are especially fun and meaningful when you travel with Dr. Key,” said Amanda Steele, president of the Student Government Association (SGA).

Vol State has dozens of events scheduled every month of the school semester. Most if not all of them are planned many months in advance. From a wide variety of lectures and presentations to slam poets, musicians and magicians.

“All students pay the student activities fee which therefore means, they are paying for these events that are hosted through [SLDI],” said Tabitha Sherrell, coordinator of Student Services in SLDI.

There are also many student leadership positions that need to be filled.

“… the President of SGA, President of ACE, and Editor of The Settler get tuition paid and a book stipend. Also, all SGA Representatives get a book stipend for attending SGA meetings on behalf of their clubs…most students probably don’t realize this incentive, but it is open to any current student to partake in as long as they put in the time and effort to take on these student leader roles.

“And, these positions look great on a resume as students prepare for jobs or further college education,” said Sherrell.

Please look out for upcoming campus events and opportunities. Vol State wants to help you learn and experience so many things as well as enjoy your time here.

We have all these lectures and events for the students.

If nobody cares or comes to the things we work hard to set up for you, then why should we try at all?

Taking pride and responsibility in your work is a wise life choice

by Ann Roberts// Editor-in-Chief

It is common for students during the school year to give a half-hearted effort at their assignments and projects.

Often times, the task is one in which the student has no interest and thus, does not complete particularly well.

Many homework assignments and projects are not completed and some are not even turned in.

This is not hurting the instructor any.

It is easier to give someone a zero on their grades for not turning in their work than to sift through apathetic content that the student thought was not worth doing well.

This attitude of passivity and negligence is only hurting the student in the end.

“I’m a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more luck I have,” said Thomas Jefferson, 3rd president of America.

The assignments for which the students are responsible are supposed showcase their ability to do what is asked of them.

If they feel that the project is not good enough for them to complete or work on at all, they are only conveying that they are lacking discipline, respect for their supervisor, maturity and tenacity.

“It is not by whining that one carries out the job of a leader,” said Napoleon Boneparte, French military leader.

If this sort of mindset and behavior is a common practice during school, how will these students obtain and sustain steady jobs in the future?

If they are used to doing what they want and not what is best then they will not succeed in a workplace environment.

“We are not here merely to make a living. We are here to enrich the world, and we impoverish ourselves if we forget this errand,” said Woodrow Wilson, 28th president of America.

When you are working on a group project, every member has a part to do.

If anyone in the party is not willing to do their work, or do it well, that not only reflects badly on that person, but it also pulls the whole group down as well.

“Show class, have pride, and display character. If you do, winning takes care of itself,” said Paul Bryant, American football coach and player.

Just being present is not going to get the job done.

“All labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance and should be undertaken with painstaking excellence,” said Martin Luther King, Jr., American Civil Rights leader.

One must have the ability to see what needs to be done and do it.

Students need to be able to gage what assignments and projects need to be done, and set time apart and make an effort to do them.

What is the point of doing something if you are not even invested in doing it the right way?

“Disciplining yourself to do what you know is right and important, although difficult, is the highroad to pride, self esteem and personal satisfaction,” said Margaret Thatcher, former prime minister of England.

One thing that I encourage you to try is, to do your assignment ñ everybody has something ñ and complete it.

The fun part is, not only do you need to make sure to include what specific instructions your instructor or boss has tasked you with, but you also need to make sure that you incorporate a part of yourself into it.

“The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence,” said Eddie Robinson, American football coach.

You can make something professional and still let it showcase a talent or quirk of yours.

Employers and teachers need to know you can do the minimum amount of acceptable work.

What gets their attention is when you go above and beyond that and can integrate your own style and individuality into your work.

It shows that you can get the job done professionally and in a way that is individualistic. It also shows a sense of pride in your work.

“Remember every job is a self portrait of the person who did it. Autograph your work with excellence,” said anonymous.

Half hearted attempts to complete something you’re not interested in will not produce a piece that you will be proud to call your own.

It does not help anybody, accomplishes nothing and impresses no one.

“It takes less time to do things right than to explain why you did it wrong,” said Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, American poet.

Take the time and effort to actually do what you need to, either for a class or a project at work.

Don’t let your boss, teacher or yourself down by doing less than bare minimum.

A job worth doing is worth doing well.

Club Spotlight: Phi Theta Kappa (PTK)

by Ja’vion Bozeman// Staff Writer

Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) is an International Academic Honor Society for two-year colleges.

Volunteer State Community College is privileged to have its own chapter.

PTK’s mission is to recognize and encourage the academic achievement of two-year college students and to provide opportunities for individual growth and development through participation in honors, leadership, service, and fellowship programming.

Dr. Merritt McKinney, director of the Honors Program, has been the advisor for PTK for over a year.

“I love Phi Theta Kappa. It’s a great opportunity for scholarships and a great way to meet motivated students who want to do community service,” said McKinney.

In order for a student to join PTK they have to obtain a 3.5 GPA.

Then Dr. Jerry Faulkner, president of Vol State, will mail the student a letter and an application that must be submitted with an $80 fee.

Jean Gorgie, English instructor and co-advisor, will accompany this chapter’s students to PTK’s annual international convention, NerdNation.

This yearís convention will take place April 16-18 in San Antonio, Texas.

NerdNation, branding the mantra “Cool 2B Smart,” is a three-day convention that will host people from all over the world.

It provides opportunities for advisor and student engagement that result in long term chapter and student success.

The 3-day agenda combines educational sessions to foster personal and chapter development, training to cultivate leaders, thought-provoking speakers who broaden attendees’ perspectives, networking opportunities to share ideas and expand ones pool of resources and award presentations recognizing past achievements while setting the bar high for future success.

“Last year we went to Orlando, and it was so great. There was dancing, workshops, and great key note speakers. They also help students transition from a 2-year college to a 4-year college,” said Gorgie.

Stephanie Winters, Dr. Rod A. Risley, Dr. David Burkus, and Dr. Michio Kaku are the featured speakers this year.

Any Phi Theta Kappa member is encouraged to attend.

For additional information, contact PTK President Ryan Carver at ccarver9@volstate.edu.