Vol State to host Transfer Fair Feb. 28

 

By Tayla Courage

Volunteer State Community College students have the opportunity to meet with college representatives at the Office of Admissions’ Transfer Fair Feb. 28, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., in the Mary Nichols Dining Room.

Representatives from 24 colleges and universities, both in-state and out-of-state, have registered to attend the fair, according to Jennifer Johnson, coordinator of student recruitment.

Johnson, although only being employed at Vol State for a short period of time, admitted that last year’s fair wasn’t as successful as it could have been.

“My experience last year, we had it in the Great Hall, and because there’s no classes over here anymore, we did not have a good turnout,” said Johnson.

She said she hopes having the event tables set up in the Wood Campus Center will allow for more student engagement.

Advisor and counselor Lindsay Guenther expressed the need for students to continue to play an active role in their individual transfer processes.

 “Make good grades! Even if you have already been admitted to a university, they will still ask for your final transcript,” according to an email from Guenther.

Guenther also urges transferring students to get an early start on their applications, especially those that concern financial aid.

“Start applying for universities and scholarships now. Scholarship deadlines for fall tend to be sooner than admissions deadlines for fall,” wrote Guenther.

Connie Pimentel, assistant director of admissions, said that she believes the Transfer Fair is a time for students to ask questions and consider the steps they may want to take after leaving Vol State.

“I think it’s great that we have the opportunity to bring those people here to give our students a chance to kind of just get a feel for what their options are,” said Pimentel.

Additional transfer information can also be found in the collection of college brochures in Ramer’s Advising Center Room 174.

Spring break fun that won’t break the bank

 

By Tayla Courage

Are you looking to have an eventful, yet inexpensive spring break? Here’s a list of five staycation options that won’t break the bank.

Nashville Public Library Community Yoga (March 3 & 10)

If you are looking to relax and destress, the Nashville Public Library offers free Saturday morning yoga sessions as a part of their “Be Well at the NPL” campaign. Yoga will take place in Hadley Park from 10:15 – 11:15 a.m. According to the Nashville Public Library’s website, people of all ages and abilities are welcome to participate in this beginner-friendly activity. The sessions will feature both breathing and stretching exercises, and attendees may choose to borrow a provided mat or bring their own.

The First Saturday Art Crawl (March 3)

If you are more interested in the downtown artistic scene, the city of Nashville hosts a free art crawl on the first Saturday of each month. Over twenty galleries participate in this monthly event, many of which offer free wine and refreshments, according to the Nashville Downtown Partnership’s website. Art crawlers will have the opportunity to view the works and exhibits of both local and world-renowned artists. Parking options for this event can be found here.

The Frist Center

If you happened to miss the art crawl, Nashville’s Frist Center offers free admission to college students with a valid student ID on Thursday and Friday nights from 5 – 9 p.m., excluding Frist Fridays. As of now there are three exhibitions available for viewing, but the Frist is constantly rotating its collections.

The Country Music Hall of Fame

The Country Music Hall of Fame benefits locals by offering free admission for youths aged 18-or-under from Davidson, Cheatham, Robertson, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson, and Wilson Counties as a part of its Community Counts program. According to the website, an adult Nashville Public Library cardholder and a plus-one from Davidson County can receive free admission by picking up a Community Counts Passport from any of the NPL locations. Proof of residency is required. The Hall of Fame is open every day from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

The Tennessee State Museum

If you’re interested in learning more about Tennessee’s history, the Tennessee State Museum offers free admission to the public Tuesday – Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.  The museum’s permanent exhibitions are free year-round, but the changing exhibitions may be charged, according to tnmuseum.org. Visitors may also explore the Military Museum or take a guided tour of the State Capitol free of charge. Hours may vary.

Colleges attending Vol State transfer fair

 

By Tayla Courage

Volunteer State Community College will be hosting a transfer fair on Wednesday, Feb. 28, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. in the Wood Campus Center. Here is a list of all the colleges registered to attend so far:

Belmont University

Bethel University

Boyce College

Bryan College

Cumberland University

East Tennessee State University

King University

Lincoln Memorial University

Lindsey Wilson College

Martin Methodist College

Middle Tennessee State University

Mississippi State University

Nossi College of Art

Tennessee Tech

Tennessee Wesleyan University

The Art Institute

The University of Alabama

The University of Tennessee – Chattanooga

Trevecca Nazarene University

Union University

University of North Alabama

University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Welch College

English professor offers students chance to relax through breathing

 

By Katie Doll

College can be stressful, but Betty Mandeville, professor of English at Volunteer State Community College, has a few techniques to help students take the time to relax and breathe.

Mandeville hosts breathing exercises from 2:15-2:45 p.m. every Monday upstairs in Thigpen Library.

Abdominal breathing for 20 to 30 minutes a day reduces anxiety and stress, according to the American Institute of Stress. By breathing deeply, the parasympathetic nervous system of the body is stimulated, bringing about a state of calmness.

At the beginning of every class, Mandeville takes the time to make sure students are fully focused. Students are encouraged to close their eyes as they are walked through a series of slow deep breathing exercises to help stressful thoughts leave their minds.

Ten years ago, after she resigned from teaching, Mandeville started her own form of exercises to help calm her down while home with her son. Five years later, she returned to teaching and thought the exercises would be helpful for students.

“My hope would be that they then use it anytime when they’re about to study for a test or have a complicated conversation or do something that makes them feel anxious,” said Mandeville.

Some of her techniques are what she would want to hear, in hopes that students would want to hear the same, she said.

One of her techniques involves simple phrases or analogies, such as “thinking of your breath as an anchor.”

Mandeville went through a certification program at Duke University. She uses some of her training for in-class exercises.

“Their scale is a bigger scale where it’s class that you take,” said Mandeville. “I offer some longer classes, but consistently, I always do whatever we can do in class to get settled in, so to speak.”

Students like Elise Piliponis, a middle college student in Mandeville’s class, have often found these routines helpful in dealing with their everyday lives.

“I don’t get a lot of sleep, so it’s like really nice to get my brain focused,” said Piliponis. “Because I have stuff going on everyday after school.”

Vol State is 220 paved parking spots short

 

Photo by Lauren Whitaker

Photo by Lauren Whitaker

By Lauren Whitaker

Volunteer State Community College is 220 paved parking spots short for the number of students who attend the college.

“This past year, well it was about a two-year process, we worked with a design and architectural firm out of Atlanta called TSW to do a master facility plan. One of the things they look at is a formula to determine how many parking spaces you should have,” said Dr. Jerry Faulkner, president of Vol State. “They came back and said we should have more parking spaces on this campus.”

During this evaluation by TSW, paved parking was the only parking considered. The two gravel overflow parking lots were not taken into account.

“I don’t know the exact number the gravel lots have. Where the gravel lots do not have lines, it’s hard to get an exact number,” Faulkner said.

Vol State plans to pave the two gravel overflow parking lots in the future.

The Tennessee Reconnect program goes into effect August 2018 at Vol State. The Reconnect program is one designed to allow adult students to go back to school tuition-free. Vol State expects an increase in students when the program begins.

“We believe a lot of these returning students are going to be students that work during the day. They will be interested in evening classes and online classes, and we are even planning to have Saturday classes to accommodate those students,” Faulkner said. “I don’t think we will have a significant parking issue.”

During the first semester of the Tennessee Promise students, Vol State addressed the parking issue by having students park in grass areas as needed. This plan will be reactivated if needed, said Faulkner.

“We can’t do that all the time because as the fall comes and the winter comes, people would get stuck,” Faulkner said.

Current students who arrive to school around mid-morning find parking to be difficult.

“I decided to take earlier classes on Tuesday and Thursday because I didn’t want to spend so much time searching for a parking space,” said Sarah Hall, a sophomore at Vol State.

“I have noticed, as the semester progresses, the parking situation gets better. I think students drop classes or people carpool,” said Shelby Swaby, a sophomore at Vol State. “I feel like there is a lot more staff parking that isn’t always filled. I don’t know how many spaces are reserved for staff, but I feel like there are always empty staff spaces.”