Study shows economic impact Vol State has on graduates

 

By Ashley Perham

Graduates from Volunteer State Community College’s class of 2016 could potentially earn $470,000 more than workers with only a high school diploma, according to a recent study.

As a whole, the 991 students from the 2016 graduating class have an earning potential of $465.8 million more than workers with only a high school diploma in their working lifetime, according to the study.

This study, “An Analysis of the College’s Economic and Social Impact,” was conducted for Vol State by Knoxville educational consultant Fred H. Martin, according to Vol State’s website.

The study also discussed the social impacts getting a degree from Vol State could have on graduates’ lives, including a greater likelihood of attending a four-year college, improved health habits, increased civic involvement, reduced poverty rates, and increased home ownership levels.

While similar studies have been done about Vol State, this study was the first to look into how a college education could impact a specific graduating class, said Eric Melcher, coordinator of public relations and marketing at Vol State. Continue reading

Snow and ice can delay or close campuses

 

Campus-snow 1-06 097 corrected

Photo by Vol State PR

By Presley Green

Snow and ice can delay classes or close campuses of Volunteer State Community College.

A delay means that classes meeting before the time given in the delay will not be held, according to the Vol State student handbook. Labs may still be held during a delay. The instructor will notify the class through the eLearn system.

If a campus is closed, no labs or classes will meet. The closing of public high schools does not affect the closing of Vol State, according to the handbook.

Closures and delays will vary from campus to campus. Alerts will be posted on Vol State’s website and social media. Students can also be alerted through email or Vol State Text Alerts. Continue reading

CAB to host “Wanna Make S’more Friends?”

 

By Tayla Courage

Volunteer State Community College’s Campus Activities Board will be hosting a social café event in the Mary Nichols Dining Room A Jan. 23 at 12:45 p.m.

The event titled “Wanna Make S’more Friends?” will be open to any students interested in becoming more involved in student life on campus.

“The idea is to spark a conversation about this event and if they would like to see more events of its kind,” according to an email from Crystal Sloss, chairperson of the Campus Activities Board. Continue reading

Usefulness, a disease? Part 1

 

By Blake Bouza

Hi there, my name is Blake Bouza and I’m the Settler’s editor-in-chief this semester. I look forward to overseeing the paper working with our writers to deliver to you, the reader, the best content we can put out there.

I was sitting in a lifespan psychology class last semester when the question was posed to the male students: would you be comfortable letting your wife go to work while you stayed home with the kids?

The overwhelming majority of guys said no. Save for me.

The professor called on me and I made the argument that we live in a time where a woman is no more capable of providing childcare than a man is, and a man is no more capable of going out and working to provide for a family.

It does not impact my self worth, I said, to not be working and providing the bread. Raising children and impacting the next generation is just as noble a cause.

Though I grew up in a very traditional home where my father went to work and my mother raised the children, this could not have seemed more obvious to me, but I got labeled a “progressive.”

When she asked other guys their thoughts on it, they said that “staying home and taking care of the kids is not enough.”

After just making the argument that raising children is a noble cause that either gender can do, this flabbergasted me.

One guy said that he was extremely unqualified for the job of child rearing.

“I’d probably forget the kid in the other room,” he said.

A couple of the girls in the classroom said they would not be comfortable letting their husbands stay home “and sit around” while they were making money and providing.

Is this how both genders view the act of being a homemaker? I thought to myself.

Now obviously my thoughts that stem from this came from the situation where one spouse stays home while the other goes and works, and not both working, so my ideas on this take place within the bounds of the scenario presented.

I had the sneaking suspicion that men would not want to raise children because it may be an overtly feminine act, but I thought there was a lot more to it than that.

The answer came to me later that night: the only difference between going out and making money, and child rearing, which are both very necessary things to do in the 21st Century, is material difference.

See, the act of going out and working and providing money is a very material thing. It is “useful.” It has output. In a farming style of the act, you can literally see the fruits of your labor. Bills get paid. New clothes are bought. Loans are paid off.

Yet the act of child rearing is a very immaterial practice, one whose fruits may reveal itself in tiny ways when your child spells a difficult word correctly, or handles a situation in a manner you taught her to handle it.

Unfortunately, there is no way to measure the quiet, warm satisfaction of seeing a child raised the way you taught them to be raised.

This important act, viewed as “just staying home and sitting around,” is instead a very real, full-time, lifetime job. Someone coming home from work gets to clock out; a parent does not.

That does it for this week, but please come back next week as we explore society’s definition of usefulness with Part 2!

In the meantime, please email us at bbouza@volstate.edu. Make sure you put “Letter to the Editor” in the subject line!

 

 

Back to school tips for students

 

By Jerushah Blackburn

After the holidays wind down, Volunteer State Community College students hoist heavy backpacks and head back to classes. However, the fog of marshmallows and hot chocolate may make it difficult for students to get back into the groove of college life.

Many students get into erratic sleep patterns over school breaks. According to the University Health Center, a division at the University of Georgia, most college students get six to almost seven hours of sleep. To be well rested, adults need 6-10 hours of sleep. The recommended amount of sleep is eight hours.

Lack of sleep can cause poor health, unhealthy weight loss or gain, increased stress, anxiety, depression, and a drop in academic performance. For these reasons, college students should develop consistent sleep patterns. These patterns include going to bed every night at a consistent time, even on weekends. Good sleep helps with the processing and retaining of information.

For new Vol State students, familiarizing themselves with their new environment, instructors, and schedules is important.

“They should also get familiar with the campus and the tremendous amount of resources available to them,” said Rebecca Adair, completion advisor of business and technology.

For returning students, a good thing to do to improve is to identify what did, and didn’t, work last semester, and think of ways to correct it.

The biggest struggle for both new and returning students can be time management, especially for students who work, either full- or part-time. Students can use a weekly schedule, writing down dates for work and school assignments.

Another method to keep in mind is “time blocking.” It is important to make breathing room within one’s schedule, in case of the unexpected, according to Livy Simpson, librarian at Thigpen Library.

Another essential part of academic success is studying. Vol State offers a large array of resources to its students. Thigpen Library offers quiet space for students to study, either alone or in groups. They also offer research guides, sorted by subject, and a website available 24/7 with chat rooms for academic help. Tutoring and the Language Center are also accessible. It is important that students do not wait until the last minute for help, according to Simpson.

 

Students can avoid flu, cold

 

By Lauren Whitaker

Because flu and cold seasons are here, there are certain tips and procedures students should practice to prevent obtaining and spreading the cold and flu.

“The single most important way to prevent flu is to get vaccinated every year,” said James Mills, nurse practitioner.

The flu vaccination does not guarantee a person will not contract the flu, but it does lower a person’s risks. It is possible the flu vaccine may not match up with the flu viruses circulating where a person lives, according to thisisinsider.com.

If a student gets vaccinated and still becomes infected, the vaccine will lower the possibility of further complications, like pneumonia, according to thisisinsider.com. Continue reading

Vol State announces nursing degree program

 

By Lauren Whitaker

Volunteer State Community College has announced that they will offer an associate degree program in nursing beginning in the fall 2019 semester.

Vol State has considered an associate degree program in nursing for eight years, according to Elvis Brandon, dean of health sciences at Vol State.

“We have actually had the proposal ready twice, but because of the cost of the program, we decided not to move forward with it the first two times,” Brandon said.

The degree is designed to stand alone. Depending on schools with a bridge program from the associate in nursing to the bachelor’s in nursing, there will be the option for students pursuing this degree to transfer, according to Brandon.

The program will have a limit on the amount of students admitted into it.

“Students will have to complete all the prerequisite classes, and obviously, it will be competitive based on grade point average,” said Brandon.

“It’s about time that Vol State got a nursing program,” said Anna Lawson, Vol State student.

“I had hoped they would start one in time for me to go to it, but I’m so excited for future students to have this opportunity. Vol State is a great school, and I’m so glad that they are giving their students more opportunities in education,” Lawson said.

Despite a bachelor’s degree in nursing being recommended, students graduating with an associate degree in nursing can work as a registered nurse, a travel nurse, a school nurse, a psychiatric nurse, and a neonatal intensive care nurse, according to nursing.org.

Students can expect to spend 18-24 months in school before graduating with an associate degree in nursing; and after earning this degree, students are required to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses before becoming a registered nurse, according to Rasmussen.edu.

Academic resources available to students

 

By Ashley Perham

  1.  Thigpen Library - Thigpen Library itself is an academic resource. On the second floor of the building, students will find thousands of physical books which can be sent to any Volunteer State Community College campus.
  2. Study rooms - Students looking for a space to study or work as group have study rooms available. Scattered throughout the library are individual study spaces, including a room designated as “silent.”
  3. IT Department - The college’s information technology department has an open computer lab on the first floor of the library with PCs, Macs, scanners, and printers.
  4. Textbook library - A limited number of textbooks are available for use in the library. Each campus library has textbooks, but there are not textbooks for every class. The services page on the library’s website links to information on textbooks and other resources available for students including technology lending.
  5. Library website - The digital gateway to the library is their website (volstate.edu/library). Here students will find a link to the databases and research guides. The research guides, curated by librarians, link students to the credible resources needed for their assignment.
  6. Library databases - The library provides access to approximately 100 databases, which are available 24/7. Students can use these databases to complete assignments or gain a better understanding of a topic discussed in class. Databases consist of ebooks, streaming videos, and articles from journals, magazines, and newspapers.
  7. Online resources - Students can use the library’s “New York Times Online” subscription to set up a free account and stay up to date with world events through their computer or a phone app. Lynda.com and LearningExpress Library can help students with the skills they need to be a successful student at Vol State.
  8. Research help - Help with research is available in many formats in addition to the library research guides. Review a video tutorial, chat online 24/7, or stop by a library on your campus for help.
  9. NoodleTools – NoodleTools is a website that helps students write papers by organizing their notes and correctly citing their sources. Access to NoodleTools is provided for Vol State students through the library website.
  10. Learning Commons - The Learning Commons in the first floor of the library. The Commons offers tutoring in math, science, reading, and writing. Math tutoring is available from the Learning Support level up to calculus. Chemistry and physics tutoring is also available. Students can also get help with reading and writing through practice essays and reading lessons and tests.
  11. Language Center - The Language Center at Vol State in SRB 205 is available to give students help with different aspects of writing essays such as thesis development, grammar, and style. French and Spanish tutors and resources are also available upon request.

LIBRARY HOURS – 615-230-3400

Monday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Thursday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Friday – 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday – 8:00 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LEARNING COMMONS HOURS – 615-230-3676

Monday – 7:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Tuesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Thursday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Friday – 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday – 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LANGUAGE CENTER HOURS – 615-230 – 3397

Monday – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday – 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Wednesday – 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Thursday – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday – 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

 

 

Finals are Finally upon VSCC Students

by Hope McKinney
The Fall semester is coming to a close and finals are quickly approaching. For many this means sleepless nights, and a lot of studying.
There are a multitude of ways to study that ensure good grades but I will just provide you with a few that work for me. Keeping your phone away or on the ‘do not disturb’ setting ensures no distractions with electronics. In this day in age that is the main source of distraction, especially with Millennials.
Our phones, laptops and IPads are always attached to us in some way, shape or form and it is just so hard to leave the virtual world alone in fear we may miss out on something. Putting your electronics away, unless of course you need them for research, is always going to help you earn a good grade on your final.
Your friends may not be much help texting you about hanging out during a long study session, but they may be of assistance to you in a study group.
I find it very helpful to study in a group, especially if someone in your group has previously taken a class in which you are currently enrolled.
Friends like the ones I mentioned may be able to give you a good deal of information that can help you during the studying process. Sharing your own study tips is always a good idea.
In study groups it is also easy to take stress free breaks from the books. Almost always friends can help you through your stressful, and most difficult times by just taking a step back with you and laughing. I can not think of a time that students need laughter more than during finals week. It is always important to let your brain rest from extensive studying. This can give your brain the same feeling as if you are cramming at the last minute, which you never want to do. When you do not take a step back and breathe you get very overwhelmed and so does your brain, it is flooded with information as such an alarming rate that it has to push things out.
This will only make you forget vital information. Forgetting is possibly the worst thing that can happen during finals week besides coming down with the flu that is making its way through the schools during Fall finals week.
A trick that I have found helps a lot of people remember what they have been studying come test day is to chew gum. Many people have told me to chew my favorite gum during studying and chew the same flavor while taking the final and it will help correlate the information you studied with the flavor of the gum.
I have not tried that trick out yet but I plan to during finals next week. Every student knows the severity of missing a final exam.
It is very important to attend class always, but during finals week and the week before it is absolutely vital to attend classes. I have said it a million times, but I will say it again, if you do not understand something this week is your last chance to get clarification on things.
There is no reason to it down for your final exam and wonder why the questions do not make sense. Our professors, especially the ones here on the Volunteer State Community College Gallatin campus, only want to see us succeed.
Their whole job revolves around our success and they love helping us reach our ultimate triumphs. I encourage every student to relax and get some major studying done before next week.
It has been my absolute pleasure to serve the student body and and faculty as the Editor-in-Chief of this newspaper and I look forward to seeing all of you next semester.
Congratulations to all of the wonderfully bright students graduating this semester.
My writing staff and I wish you nothing but success in your future endeavors. If any of your find yourself looking for credit hours to fill, or a fun way to relieve stress and make friends please consider joining us on The Settler’s staff.
We are always looking for talented individuals that love expressing themselves through journalism.
Have a very Merry Christmas and happy holidays. I hope to see everyone next year.