Nunsense coming soon to Volunteer State

This semester Volunteer State Community College’s Theater program is working on a play called Nunsense.

The event is a musical comedy play that will have singing, dancing and laughing.

There will be auditions for any Vol State student who love to sing, act and dance.

Auditions will occur on Feb. 9-11, from 6-8 p. m. and will take place in the Wemyss Auditorium in Caudill Hall.

“I’m very excited to be auditioning for Nunsense,”said Logan Kemp, a Vol State student and actor.

Edmon Thomas, professor of communication and theater, will be directing the play. He said he is looking for highly motivated people who can sing, act and dance.

He is mostly looking for female actors but there are a few male roles in the play.

This play has two lead roles and Thomas is looking for two females to play the part
of Sister Mary Regina and Sister Robert Anne.

Nunsense was created by Dan Goggin, who is an American writer, composer and lyricist.

The play was written in 1985 and since then has been translated into 21 different languages.

Nunsense is about a nun who accidently poisons and kills 52 of her sisters, and is in need of money. They start a fundraiser to raise money to bury their nun sisters who died from food poisoning.

To raise money, they put on shows in a school auditorium that is set up for the play Grease.

This musical comedy has tap dancing, ballet, singing and comedy zingers.

Vol State students with their student IDs are free.

For other attendees, tickets are five dollars.

The musical will also have a live band performance from the Vol State band.

They will be providing the background music for all the singing and dancing.

“I’m really excited for the music and theater departments coming together to put on a great show,” said William York, stage manager who will be working along side Thomas.

York will be setting up the stage and getting the cast ready for opening night in March.

Thomas, who will be overseeing the casting and rehearsal, said he is very excited about the play. “It will be a fun musical comedy that all ages from kids to adults can enjoy,” said Thomas.

Changes coming to African American Student Union

One of Volunteer State Community College student clubs, African American Student Union (AASU), is going through changes.
Zachary Ford, former vice president, stepped down and transferred authoritative power to Ashlyn Challenger.
Challenger says she is a little “nervous” but “excited” about being the new president.
She said she is looking forward to learning new things and influencing students in a positive way.
“Our goal for the semester is to … empower one another and to promote positivity,” said Challenger.
February is Black History Month and with its arrival, the Gallatin campus has events lined up each week.
This Wednesday, Feb. 4, Poet Odd Rod will perform in the Mary Cole Nichols Tiled Dining Room at 12:30 p.m.
He will share his personal story of overcoming the odds.
The annual Soul Food Luncheon, AASU’s most largely attended event, is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 11 at noon in the Carpeted Dining Room.
“This event is open to all Vol State students and the focus will be Black Literary Figures,” said Ford.
Beginning at 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 19, Lunch and Learn will take place in the Carpeted Dining Room.
Attendees are encouraged to bring their own lunches.
Drinks and desserts will be provided by the office of Student Life and Diversity Initiatives (SLDI).
Directly afterward there will be a concert.
The annual Black History Recognition Luncheon is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 25, at 12:30 p.m. in the Carpeted Dining Room.
Students must RSVP prior to the event through SLDI in the Wood Campus Center, Room 215.
In addition to these on-campus events, AASU also has regular scheduled meetings each Monday at 10 a.m. and Thursday at 12:30 p.m. in the student lounge, located in first floor of the Wood Campus Center.
This is subject to change “depending on the schedule of who joins the club on Welcome Days,” said Challenger. According to Colossians 3:13 – 14, “Continue putting up with one another and forgiving one another freely even if anyone has a cause for complaint against another. But besides all these things, clothe yourselves with love, for it is a perfect bond of union.”
AASU is currently seeking a Vice President and a Treasurer. If interested, stop by the table on Welcome Day, this Thursday, between 10 a.m. and noon or email achallenger@volstate.edu.

Taking the initiative can change your life for the better

To be frank, I had no inkling to become the editor-in-chief of this school’s newspaper. I was asked to apply for the position because I became a surprisingly active and constant member in the club under the previous editor’s reign.

I really did not want to be the boss due to all that pressure to perform and keep on top of everything and be the figurehead to the other club members. The thought of myself in that leadership role made me shiver. My heart sank with apprehension when I was hired for the job.

I passed the most basic qualifications, but I had no knowledge about newspapers, how they were run or how I was supposed to run one. I was petrified.

Do you know how many people beside myself applied for the editor’s position? Zero. There was no option B.

There are two possible explanations for why that was. One, nobody knew that the position was available for application or two, they knew but nobody wanted the job.

Do not get me wrong; I do not regret applying and having the position I have. I am so thankful for this opportunity that has caused me to grow, learn and experience things I never imagined would happen in my life.

However when I began to wrap my mind around the concept of little ole’ me becoming the confident, organized and decisive editor The Settler needed, I was reeling from the unreality of it.

“Never be afraid to fail. Failure is only a stepping-stone to improvement. Never be overconfident because that will block your improvement,” said Tony Jaa.

My job keeps me busy and is often stressful, but I would not trade it for the simpler life I had before. Now I’ve gotten a taste of the business and it’s given me a new perspective on how I can make a difference.

This experience has helped me develop useful skills and allowed me to meet and connect with more people. It was a scary transition for a wallflower like me, but it was unmistakably worth it.

I was afraid to take this job and adjusting to my position and responsibilities was a bit rocky, but if I had to do it all again, knowing what I know now, I would still take the job.

“I would rather regret the things I have done than the things I have not,” said Lucille Ball.

Last spring semester there was also an opportunity for students to apply for positions for the Student Government Association (SGA). There was only one candidate for each of the positions. The cabinet ran unopposed and inevitably was given the positions.

The president we have now was the only one who applied, and it may look to some, that she was the only one who cared about doing something through the SGA.

There are plenty of students at Vol State, but apparently only an extremely small percentage is interested in participating and leading student clubs and organizations.

“If you’re not actively involved in getting what you want, you don’t really want it,” said Peter McWilliam.

There are avenues for excellence in every corner of this campus.

The Honors Program, Service Learning club, Squatter’s Rites publication, SGA and so many more are available and always looking for more members.

Supplemental Instruction, Leanring Commons and Language Center have hiring  opportunities.

I encourage you to take the initiative. You’re not selling your soul to do so. Just try it.

Let our student body not be comprised of individuals suffering from the bystander effect. If nobody ever steps up to the plate, then nothing extraordinary and noteworthy will be talked about or appreciated.

“I’ve always had confidence. It came because I have lots of initiative. I wanted to make something of myself,” said Eddie Murphy.

There are opportunities all over this campus to go the extra mile and accomplish something that needs to be done, though few wish for the responsibility.

Take the initiative, you don’t know what can be discovered, invented or enhanced. Who knows how many people you could affect by stepping up and doing what needs to be done?

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover,” said Mark Twain.

 

 

 

Groundbreaking Ceremony dedicates new building for Humanities

Volunteer State Community College had a Groundbreaking Ceremony on Jan. 16 for the soon-to-be built Humanities building.

The event was in the Mary Cole Nichols Carpeted Dining Room from 7:30-8:45 a.m. and began with a breakfast buffet.

The Vol State Jazz Ensemble, including James Story, chair of Visual and Performing Arts and Ben Graves, instructor of Music, performed in a corner of the dining room.

Lauren Shifflett Wiese, a Studio Art major, displayed and executed her charcoal sketches of the event.

Pam Nixon and Leanne Tucker, Vol State students, presented and produced examples of their printmaking work.

There were also layout designs of the three different floors in the new building and computer generated pictures of the displayed.

Dr. Jerry Faulkner, president of Vol State, mentioned in his opening statements that the new humanities building had been a vision for the school for 12 years.

It is going to be the largest building on the Gallatin campus.

“I did not know that it was [88,345] square feet. That’s amazing. So I’m very excited to see the school really expanding we have all this wonderful campus. And I’m glad to see that the humanities will actually have a home finally,” said Weise.

Some of the features in the new Humanities building include; 23 classrooms, 56 offices, 11 collaborative study areas, an outdoor amphitheater and courtyard, computer labs, art gallery and a recording studio.

“I’m very excited that it’s going to be the biggest building on site. Finally all the arts, fine arts, music, our theater gets to be in one building. I think it’s going to be easier and better for collaboration reasons in all respects,” said Kealani Hughes, student president of Delta Psi Omega, Vol State’s theater club.

“I think it’s exciting. I think it says a lot for Vol State in terms of where we’re going as a college and there’s a lot for the community as well,” said Lauren Collier, executive assistant to the office of the president.

Tyler Dunn, a Vol State student, was the first to speak at the ceremony after Faulkner’s opening remarks. Dunn spoke about his experience as an Entertainment Media Production major and how the new building will benefit students.

“The new Humanities building has so much potential and I’m so excited for the opportunity and achievement to come … not just for me but for future students, ” said Dunn in his speech.

Other speakers at the event included Bea Thompson of Moody Nolan and Tom Lampe from Messer Construction who provided more information about the process and how the new building will improve the Vol State campus.

“It is a very good idea to have all these people to come together to collaborate and that is why it’s so beautiful. … It’s not so great that all the arts are scattered out,” said William York, a member of Delta Psi.

The completion date for the building is expected to take place in Summer 2016.

“As soon as you open the doors you’re going to be in the mood to achieve,” said Cindy Fox, a theater major.

 

Long Story Short #1

Kathleen Long// Contributing Writer

Hi! My name is Kathleen Long and this is my new column called Long Story Short. For those of you who know me (which is pretty much everybody) this is hilarious. For everyone else, you are confused. Let me clear it up for you. In this column I will tell a story of some kind, and will try to have a take-away point, or lesson in the end.

I am the President of the Association of Campus Events (ACE) Club. I enjoy being in a club, and I also enjoy holding the title of “president.” But, even more than that, I enjoy being involved with my school. I think it is important to network and get to know people. Most students come to school, go to their classes, and then leave. They think this is the right way to do it. WRONG! That is the dumb way to do it. Volunteer State Community College has clubs, planned events and tries to do as much as possible to make the stress of college as great of an experience as they possibly can. I would say they are doing a good job for only being a community college and not having the budget and resources of universities.

I suggest that you find someone who is in a club and ask them how they like it. Almost all of them will encourage you to join a club and get involved as well. Being a club member also has perks: You have the chance to get to know the staff and teachers; if you get a board position you can get paid; and you are always in the know.

Long story short: My last name is Long, I am short, this is my new column where I tell it like it is and you should join a club.