Man on the Quad 2/6/18

What would you change about Vol State?

Music students should get advisors that are in the music program or the AFA program – D

Parking. If they paved the extra parking, it’d be perfect, but people don’t know how to park without lines – G

I actually parked over at the maintenance building one time, and somebody hit my car, and there’s no cameras over there so that’s what I would change. Get some cameras over there – M

The piano practice rooms should be soundproof – A

One thing I would change would be more study rooms for the library. They have a really good library, and I really enjoy it and take advantage of it, but more study rooms – J

Make it easier to contact your advisors – F

The cafeteria definitely needs work. Mostly those [booths along wall]. It just needs to be re-done – N

Maybe the bathrooms. Like keeping them more clean- C

Annual Soul Food Luncheon Educates

 

By Presley Green

Vol State’s annual Soul Food Luncheon will be Wednesday, Feb. 7th, 12:45 p.m., in the Mary Cole Nichols Dining Room in the Wood Campus Center.

Everyone in the campus community is welcome.

There will be a dramatic reading at the luncheon, and Dr. Kenny Yarbrough, manager of diversity and inclusion, will be giving an address.

The event is sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion to kick off Black History Month.

“People bond around food and most Southern people like soul food. This luncheon highlights the origin of soul food, and how it came to be,” according to Yarborough.

The lunch promotes an understanding of culture and unity around something most people appreciate, good food, according to Yarborough.

“By highlighting our similarities, we can learn to appreciate our differences,” according to Yarborough.

 

Vol State Updates Website

 

By Tayla Courage

Volunteer State Community College sent an email announcement notifying students about its new mobile-friendly website Jan. 30.

Cindy Williams, a web designer for Vol State, described how the “clean and contemporary” appearance allows students and faculty to locate information more efficiently.

“The content has been streamlined and formatted in a way that is easier to skim through and read, both visually and by screen readers and assistive technology,” according to an email from Williams.

Harmoni Eddington and Jacob West, two students in Introduction to Electronic Media, voiced their opinions on the layout of the new website.

“It looks a lot more user-friendly,” said Eddington, a freshman.

“It’s snazzy. It looks sleek. It’s much better than the last website,” said West, a sophomore.

Visitors to the website may also notice a name change in the header of the website. Rather than saying “Volunteer State Community College,” the new header simply says “Vol State Community College.”

Market research has revealed that more students prefer the use of “Vol State” when referring to the campus, according to Jason Bugiada, web and digital media administrator.

Since our website serves as our primary online marketing piece for Vol State, we made the decision to incorporate the “Vol State Community College” logo in the top header,” wrote Bugiada.

He also made sure to point out the original “Volunteer State Community College” logo is still on the website’s footer.

Tami Wallace, director of public relations and marketing, is confident in the market research and believes the redesign will prove to be beneficial to both current and incoming students.

“Throughout the planning process of redesigning volstate.edu, our vision was to create an impactful, student-centered platform to attract incoming students as well as emulate our warm campus community in online form,” explained Wallace in an email.

Tips for navigating Vol State’s new website can be found on The Vol State Virtual Community page located at volunteerstatecommunitycollege.blogspot.com.

 

VSCC to Celebrate Black History Month

 

By Riley Holcraft

Volunteer State Community College is celebrating Black History Month with events around campus throughout February.

Vol State offers events that range from leisure game-playing to informative lectures in honor of Black History. Students are encouraged to attend events to learn about important achievements of historical African-American figures.

On February 6, the CAB Café is hosting a Black History Bingo in the Wood Campus Center’s Mary Cole Nichols Dining Hall B. The event begins at 12:45 p.m. and is open to all.

The Diversity and Inclusion office is hosting a Soul Food Luncheon Feb.7, 12:45 p.m., in Wood Campus Center Mary Cole Nichols Dining Hall B.

“The Soul Food Luncheon is a celebration of the historical facts behind ‘Soul Food’.  Come join us for delicious food, fellowship and entertainment,” the Office stated on Vol State’s website,

The History department will begin its World War I lecture series in Thigpen Library’s Rochelle Center Feb. 14, 1 p.m. The title of the lecture is “African Americans and the Great War” Grady Eades, history department chair, is the speaker.

The Great War it is often a part of American history that is overlooked, said Eades.

“We are currently in the centennial of the Great War (1914-1918). Thus, the History Department thought this would be a unique opportunity to focus on World War I and its impact. The first presentation is on African Americans and the war to line up with Black History month,” said Eades.

It is important for students to celebrate Black History Month because African-American history is part of American history, he said.

Kennedy Caruthers, student at Vol State, commented that she would be most interested in attending the history lecture event.

“Black history month is important to me, especially coming from a black family. We live in a country where we are so diverse, it is important to recognize our impact on the world,” said Caruthers.

The Diversity and Inclusion office is also hosting a read-in of pieces by African-American authors by students, faculty, and staff in the Great Hall of the Ramer Administration Building Feb. 19, 12:45 p.m.

This event is open to anyone who is interested. Students can contact the Diversity and Inclusion office at diversityandinclusion@volstate.edu if they would like to read.

Student Danielle Sharp said she is most interested in attending the Black History Read-In.

“I am familiar with many African-American writers, such as Maya Angelou. This is a great way to honor many talented writers in history,” said Sharp.

Pioneers Prepare for 2018 Baseball Season

 

By Nick Kieser

The Volunteer State Community College Pioneers baseball team has started practicing and preparing for their full 45-game schedule.

The team has scrimmaged to give the coaches a chance to look at their players.

“I know that these guys will give me all they got,” said Ryan Hunt, head coach.

The Pioneers record last year was 29-20, and the team is focused on carrying over the positive aspects from last season.

“Having a winning season was good,” said Hunt. He hopes the winning tradition will continue into this 2018 season.

The Pioneers fell to the Parkland College Cobras late in the last few innings of the postseason last year.

“We played well in conference tournament and had the number one seed beat until the last inning,” said Hunt.

Now, the team wants to go is to put that loss behind them and move on. An early goal for the Pioneers is to beat Walter State and Dyersburg State. Both teams are considered ‘powerhouses’ by Hunt.  

The first regular season game is Feb. 9.  

Chase Haley, freshman relief pitcher, believes that his team has a lot to offer as the games are coming up.

Haley is currently a redshirt due to his health. Haley is trying to gain some muscle weight and strength as he is building back up to full participation. If he gets “back to 100 percent” and plays well, Hunt would take away the redshirt, Haley said.

Jordan Williams, freshman right outfielder, is also a redshirt.

“As a redshirt my goal is to develop and get better with skills,” said Williams. He wants to play his game and focus on his job on the field the best he can.

Williams, who has been playing baseball since he was five, sees the team heading in the right direction.

“We’ve come together a lot with having skilled players, and I think we’re going to be pretty good this year,” said Williams, a future sports athletic trainer.

“There were teams who beat us consistently, and we want to change that,” said Williams,.

One thing that has seemed important to all the team is keeping each other accountable and having good leaders.

Collin Hopkins, a catcher in his last year as a Pioneer, is looked up to by Williams.

“I know I can look up to him and that he has my back, but he also helps everyone gain confidence,” said Williams.

Jake Lyle, pitcher, is a role model for Haley.

“Jake has signed with ETSU, and we hope that more players will get looks as well,” said Hunt.

The goal for the team is to make it to the postseason and go to the College World Series.

“The key to our season is going to be our starting pitching, goal is to keep teams off balance,” said Hunt.

In order to have a successful season Hunt also has three elevated expectations of his players.

“Work hard, go to class, and represent yourself in the right way on and off the field,” he said.

The Vol State Pioneers will begin their regular season schedule in Millington, Tennessee, Feb. 9th against the Johnson County Community College Cavaliers in the Flag City Classic tournament this weekend. Their first home game at Garrett Baseball Field is Friday, Feb. 16, at 2 p.m.