Being snowbound allows you time to take a break and catch up with work as well as make sure priorities are met

by Ann Roberts// Editor-in-Chief

The opportunity for seclusion can be both a blessing and a curse.

Last week all of the members of the Volunteer State Community College community experienced the occasion of having school be closed for three days and early closings on Thursday and Friday due to snow and ice.

When one is basically forced to stay at home and is unable to go to work or school, it gives them the opportunity to do some of the things they would like to do when those afore said things are in the way.

After a while though, some begin to experience cabin fever and become stir crazy.

Those fortunate enough to not have had their electricity and wifi go out were able to keep warm; have full function of their refrigerators, ovens and televisions; and keep in contact with their friends and family.

The situation of having multiple snow days gave everyone an early spring break of sorts.

Classes could still communicate via the eLearn site and most instructors were accessible through e-mail.

Most, if not all, of the Vol State community could take a break and enjoy spending time with their family and friends.

Many students, who may have felt like they were falling behind with their homework, had the opportunity to catch up with their studies.

The sooner I fall behind, the more time I have to catch up, said Author Unknown.

One could catch up on their latest viewing pleasures or reading material, spend time with their family, catch up on house chores and get ready for the hectic-ness of life when the snow and ice have detained us no more.

“Anyone can do any amount of work, provided it isnít the work he is supposed to be doing at that moment,” said Robert Benchley, American humorist and newspaper columnist.

One thing that is always welcome from the regular bustling of everyday activities is a breather.

But one must know when the breather has become an excuse to not do oneís duties.

“Nobody’s life is ever all balanced. It’s a conscious decision to choose your priorities every day,” said Elizabeth Hasselbeck, American television personality.

It is hard to do schoolwork, housework and work-from-home work when all of your loves ones are also there and restless.

“Every duty which is bidden to wait returns with seven fresh duties at its back,” said

Charles Kingsley, English clergyman and historian.

It is much easier to goof off and push off one’s responsibilities for another time when there are not so many people around who want to have fun and enjoy your company.

“Decide what you want, decide what you are willing to exchange for it. Establish your priorities and go to work,” said H. L. Hunt, American political activist and entrepreneur.

Unfortunately, too often we procrastinate too much and regret our decisions later.

Too many things are due at too much of the same time and it”s difficult to try and accomplish anything when you feel rushed and lost for time.

Time management is an oxymoron. Time is beyond our control, and the clock keeps ticking regardless of how we lead our lives.

“Priority management is the answer to maximizing the time we have,” said John C. Maxwell, American author and speaker.

One can balance between the fun of a snow day and taking a chunk of time here and there to make sure you are on top of your responsibilities.

ìSuccess is only another form of failure if we forget what our priorities should be,î said Harry Lloyd, English actor.

Please take the time to get your priorities strait.

It is tricky sometimes to always know what is more important when some deadlines conflict with other plans and engagements.

There will be time for fun and games and there are times when working is a necessity.

ìWise are those who learn that the bottom line doesn’t always have to be their top priority,î said William Arthur Ward, American author.

I have severe problems with procrastination and prioritizing what I do and when I do it.

But I have resolved to change my ways and make an effort to get my act together and keep up with my workload.