CAB Hosted Women’s History Trivia

 

By Tayla Courage

In honor of Women’s History Month, Volunteer State Community College’s Campus Activities Board organized a trivia-themed café event in the Mary Cole Nichols Dining Room B March 27, at 12:45 p.m.

Crystal Sloss, chairperson of the campus activities board, explained that the formatting of the trivia activity would be similar to the game show Jeopardy. Participants used wireless buzzers to answer questions on prominent women in history.

While students were competing for the opportunity to win free Vol State merchandise, there were no penalties for incorrect answers.

“We want students to have fun and learn something at the same time,” wrote Sloss.

Similar to previous CAB café events, free food was offered as an incentive for more student engagement. Chicken tenders, chips and lemonade were available for anyone willing to join in for at least one round of trivia.

According to an email from Sloss, this isn’t the first women’s history event CAB has hosted.

“Last year we held a Women’s History BINGO. This year we thought it would be a great idea to try something new, which is where the trivia comes into play,” wrote Sloss.

Hayley Brazel, secretary of the student government association, said she enjoyed the educational PowerPoint that Sloss paired with her questions.

“Crystal was a great moderator. She taught us so much,” said Brazel.

Wyatt Tabor, a freshman, was continuously one of the first players to buzz in each round.  

“It was really fun. I enjoyed it, and I’m definitely coming back,” said Tabor.

Taylor Divney, a sophomore, commented on why she liked the event in correlation with Women’s History Month.

“I think us women are pretty savvy, so it’s cool to learn about the important and powerful things we’ve done,” she said.

Sloss said she hopes to see more creative learning opportunities offered to students and mentioned the possibility for women’s history trivia to return as an annual event.

“Students can leave the event, know that they have had fun, a free meal, and most importantly they have left with new information that they can spread to others,” wrote Sloss.