Building credit for the first time

By Sara Keen
Recently, I found myself in desperate need of a new car, and unfortunately I needed a loan to purchase anything for transportation.
Loans require a credit history, which is based on previous transactions, such as credit cards, car loans or even apartment rentals.
One recurring thing that I heard and read when I was working on starting my credit was the one thing that tends to scare us: the credit card.
As Judy Woodard of Macon Bank and Trust explained, credit cards are basically a recurring credit. Each month, it reports that you owe and have paid on (hopefully) your credit limit.
For example, each month someone may have $600 reported and “paid for” to build your credit history based on their $600 credit limit.
There are many different credit cards available, featuring cash back rewards, travel miles, and even some breaks for certain people.
If you are a student, for example, you can most likely apply for a student credit card. Many of these offer cash back rewards for buying gasoline, going out to eat and using popular shopping websites or stores.
Student credit cards also typically offer cash back or miles for good grades. For example, Discover It Student Cards offer $20 for a GPA of 3.0 or higher, and Capital One has a student Journey card for those who like to or need to travel to receive help from their GPA.
Students can also try what are called secured credit cards.
“A secured card is backed by a cash deposit you make up-front; the deposit amount is usually the same as your credit limit,” according to nerdwallet.com.
Secured credit cards are meant specifically for those wanting to build credit, and the down payment is used as a collateral if a payment is missed.
For those who have trouble saving up with a typical savings account, you may also look into a credit-builder loan.
The loan, in this case, is held by the lender until you pay it back, making it a good way to “save” some money by investing it into a larger sum for later on.
“It’s a forced savings program of sorts, and your payments are reported to credit bureaus,” added nerdwallet.com.
For bigger loans, you can also look for a co-signer. A co-signer is a person who signs with you on a loan to help pay it off if you find yourself unable to do so.
However, not every person wants to risk their credit to help someone else build credit. It is important that you establish yourself as dependable and keep up with your payments if you have a co-signer. They “put their credit on the line” to help you.
Co-signers tend to be the family of younger people. As I mentioned before, I needed a car and had little-to-no credit whatsoever, so my mom co-signed my loan.
This means that if I fail to make my car payment each month, then it falls on her to take care of it.
Building your credit is a very lengthy process, and there are some hurdles to jump before you get there. However, it does pay off long term when you need a car, are looking for an apartment or even looking to purchase your own home.
It is good to begin young and build a strong credit history, so that you are not stuck needing credit in the future.

Spooky Story Contest first place winner is…

Student Submission
Hare’s Race
by Bianca Riddle

I make it here before her. At dusk. There’s a haze of yellow just above the tree line in the distance.
If you’ve watched her long enough you’ve picked up on her habits, if you’ve followed her pattern. We’re both creatures of habit; she has her routine and I have her. Adeline will jog for about four laps and walk two. She’ll pass me six times tonight. She’ll come in the park carrying two water bottles. She’ll walk the whole length of the park once, dropping off her water bottles in the grass, behind the benches towards the two entrances of the park. I’ve thought about how easy it would be to slip something in her water. But I won’t. I sit at the eastward entrance on the bench farthest from where she’ll drop off her water. I don’t want to startle her.
I sit on the bench, finishing off half a sleeve of crackers before she comes round.
My chest twists in knots when I finally see her. Tight grey capris, bright yellow jacket. Sleeves bunched up. Her curly red hair in a ponytail. Freckles crawling up her arms. She’s listening to Roxanne. She’s a huge Police fan. She sets her bottle down. I take advantage of her being distracted. I wave, she mimics without hesitation, and when I’m out of her peripheral I wipe my sweaty palms on my jacket before pulling out my Canon Powershot. The first few photos are out of focus; of her shoes, socks, and the backs of her calves. Practice shots. Accidental. But the frame crawls up her back and I get pictures of her long spindly hair.
The palm of my hand itches when she jogs by the bench. Pinned hair swaying back and forth, swiping over the shoulders of her soft eece jacket. She doesn’t see the camera. She doesn’t stop for a drink of her water. She smiles at me though. She ashes that beautiful smile at every stranger. She’s an angel. I confess my love to her from my place on the bench; loud enough for her to hear if she weren’t listening to music.
I can’t explain what it is that puts these thoughts in my head. Where it stems from. It could simply be that Adeline is a beautiful woman. Those doe-y blue eyes. …I want to feel her breathing next to me. I don’t intend to harm her. I just want her next to me. I can hear her humming before she passes me for the third time. I lower my camera again. This lap it’s Barenaked Ladies. Next it will be techno electronica or Coldplay. She dashes past me. “I love you Adeline Phisher.” I repeat loudly.
I love you.
I LOVE YOU.
She stops, one water bottle in hand. She’s on her cool down lap. This is my opportunity. I don’t feel the cold air. Adrenaline is fizzing underneath my skin. I stand up and grab the tennis racquet from the dirt ground underneath my seat.
She stands after tying her shoe, both bottles in her arm, and I crack her against the temple with the old racquet. I found it in the garage. I brought it for this moment. This memory. She takes a nasty fall. I take my place beside her on
the ground.
Once she opens her eyes I look into them. I can see the starry sky mirroring
in the corners of them. I lean in and brush my knuckles against her cheek. She withers away from me. “I won’t hurt you Adeline.”
I must’ve rattled her good. Blood’s pouring from her head and back into her hair. I didn’t mean to hit her hard. I reach out my hand and press my palm to her collar bones. She’s still breathing. It’s tiny.
I look back up at the stars. “I’m glad I could spend time with you.” I confess. We lie there on the warm orange pebbled sidewalk. She’s closed her eyes. Her hair smells as nice as I thought it would. Like cinnamon. Ginger. The Dave Matthews Band is playing loudly from her headset. I know the kind of music she likes.
I snap a photo of us. Together. Nothings more important than this moment with her.
These fickle fuddle words confuse me Like ‘will it rain today?’
Waste the hours with talking, talking These twisted games we’re playing This is all I wanted.
We’re strange allies With warring hearts –
All I’ve wanted.

The Spooky Story Contest runner-up is…

Faculty Submission
Demon in My View
by April Young

He was on the bathroom floor when I got up that morning—not him, really, but the swirls on the tile hinting at the black-and-white pictures I’d seen, the thick wave of dark hair, deep circles under the eyes, the coarse mustache.
“It is time, Annabell,” he announced, his voice raspy with disuse. “Today we begin!”
I shrieked and reeled backward, and the tile swirls vibrated with his laughter.
I ed the house in terror, but I hadn’t really escaped him. As I dove into the driver’s seat of my car, I found him on the steering wheel, a bit clearer now, the tan leather revealing his sunken cheeks and rounded chin. He hurled demands as I drove, urging me to press harder on the gas pedal, to ignore each red light, to nd my destination. I tried to fight him, but it was useless; he murmured a hypnotic chant that stripped me of control.
I’d only driven a few miles when he ordered me to turn down an unfamiliar road which ended at a gravel lane. Icy fingers of fear clawed my throat. “This isn’t where I work,” I protested weakly, even as my hands turned the wheel and my tires bounced over gravel.
“Your errand is long overdue,” he snapped. “Here—this is the place. Out!”
A white Victorian loomed in front of me. My legs shook as I approached the porch. The doorbell chimed through the front hall before I realized I’d pushed it.
“What am I doing here?” I gasped, willing my leaden feet to run away.
When the door opened, I was relieved—and then horri ed. A woman stared at me, her smile taking up most of her face. Instead of smiling back, I snatched at her brown hair, jerking her outside.
Her screams matched mine and shattered the peaceful morning air, but he was shouting louder than both of us. His voice rang out clearly now, so strong it pulsed through my body. Two words, over and over again, tore through my brain: “Do it!”
In anguish, the woman lashed out, raking her nails across my arm. The slight trickle of blood seemed to wake me from a stupor, and I released the child and stumbled back to the car.
His outrage was so great that it pulled the air from my lungs. I drove home in blind terror, and all the while he swore in strangled rage.
“Curse the Conqueror Worm!” he spat. “Heaven hath me not in its sacred keep these 176 years!”
I hid in my bed, the door locked and the blinds drawn, for days. I didn’t sleep, for he taunted me every hour, railing against my weakness. I lost the will to question him, to beg him to end my torment. At times, he was quiet—only to start anew just as I’d begun to believe he’d gone. I’m certain I tried to resist, but I cannot recall it now. Nearly two centuries of fury, of mourning the ruin of his legacy, had given him bitter determination.
When vitriol failed, he moved to poetry, calling me Annie and tempting me out of my gloom with the promise of rest. What else could I do but submit?
Some nights later, as I lay there still, the skies opened, unleashing a rare October storm that bathed my room in light. I opened my swollen eyes and heard a new sound, melodious and enticing, and I strained my ears to decipher the
lyrics.
“Ah, the crisis—the danger is past, and the lingering illness is over at last,”
he crooned. “And the seraphs will not be half so happy as I when we are through.
Up!”
A giggle escaped my lips as I made my way back to the Victorian on that
gravel lane. A ash of lightning cut the clouds and rested upon my arm. The thin scratches of days before had become an angry red tattoo, his mien now fully formed upon my fresh, and I knew what I, Annabell Poe, was to do: avenge myself—and him, oh, yes, I’d avenge him—for that hateful travesty of slander.
Ravens circled the darkened sky above me, heedless of the slashing torrent, as I mounted the steps and rang the bell. He and I were outside of space and time now, but the family was inside; I could hear their unsuspecting laughter over the thunder.
“It was lies, all lies,” he hissed from my skin. “Purloiner, philanderer, abuser, executor—ha! My executer! Now he shall cry perennial tears from that unmarked tomb!”
Just as the front door opened, I peered through the black; the mailbox at the end of the lane filled me with fresh anger, for it had no right to exist. Together, he and I would rectify the injustice, eradicate the hated name—Griswold—from the tortured earth.
Morning had broken by the time I left the house, and he allowed me a moment’s satisfaction—but it quickly dissipated when I thought of the work left to do. Until I had driven the last Griswold to awful eternity, he and I could rest— NEVERMORE!
Author’s note: Since 1849, Edgar Allan Poe has been unable to speak for himself. He could not have had a more mendacious, perfidious, and unctuous biographer than Rufus Wilmot Griswold.

Ben Troxler performs at Vol State

by Michaela Marcellino
Ben Troxler, Bass Vocalist, per- formed in a voice recital at Volunteer State Community College on Oct. 18. This performance took place at the Steinhauer-Rogan-Black Humanities Building and lasted from 2:30-3:30 p.m., and Troxler was accompanied by Matt Phelps on piano.
Troxler graduated from Vol State with an Associate Degree and from Austin Peay State University with a Bachelor of Science in Composition, and currently serves as the Director of Music Ministries and pianist at Glendale United Methodist Church, and is the bass section leader in the Sanctuary Choir of West End United Methodist Church.
This recital started with Troxler singing “Arm, Arm Ye Brave” and “Si, tra i cieppi” that are both writ- ten by George Frederic Handel. After the rst two songs, Troxler then sang Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s “In diesen heil’gen Hallen” from “Die Zauber oete.”
I thought that those songs Troxler sang showed an upbeat mood which
I really like. I loved the way how the chords would change when Phelps would play the piano on “Si, tra i cieppi,” and also how calm and nice Troxler sounded when he sang “In diesen heil’gen Hallen.”
Troxler then performed Johannes Brahm’s “O wiist ich doch den Weg zurück” which had a much darker mood than the first three songs. Also he performed Jean Baptiste Lully’s “Bois épais” written by Jean Bap- tiste Lully and Gabriel Fauré’s “Les Berceaux.”
What I like about those songs is how emotional Troxler and Phelps sounded when they played those songs from Phelps’ piano playing and
Troxler’s singing.
After Troxler performed “Les
Berceaux,” Phelps played Sergei Rachmaninoff’s “Sonata no. 2 in B- at minor, Op 39 in the second movement in non-allegro-lento.
Then Troxler sang a series of songs all composed by Aaron Copland to close the recital, and those songs were “The Boatmen’s Dance,” “Long Time Ago,” “Simple Gifts,” “At the River,” and “Zion’s Walls.”
I really enjoyed how uplifting these songs sounded in the recital, especially in “The Boatmen’s Dance,” which Troxler sounded con dent with his singing.
Annabelle Lee, former adjunct professor, said that Troxler and Phelps performed well in the recital, and that he performed the pieces effortlessly and communicated effectively with his audience.
“I thought that performance was
wonderful,” said Benjamin Graves, Assistant Professor of Music.
“Troxler and Phelps were fantastic in their performance, and I especially enjoyed the Brahms selection as well as the Copland songs, and even Phelps’ performance of ‘Sonata no. 2 in B- at minor, Op 39.
“ I loved how rich and warm Troxler sounded with his voice which made it easy to listen to for the audience, and kudos to Nancy Slaughter for hosting these wonderful musicians,” continued Graves.
“I thought this performance was well-done with Troxler’s spot-on and correct vocal technique and Phelps’ piano playing,” said Nancy Slaughter, Associate Professor of Music. “Troxler told me that it was great to perform at Vol State, and personally it was lovely to see him perform since he was my student in 1999.”

VSCC holds understanding sexual assault seminar

by Lillian Lynch
On Oct. 18 You have the Power… know how to use it, Inc. hosted a seminar on understanding sexual assault.
Veronica Clark, the main speaker, began the presentation with background information on You have the Power. It was formed in 1993 by Andrea Conte, the former First Lady of Tennessee and a victim of sexual assault.
Clark showed a documentary entitled “I Never Thought it was Rape.” The video showed three women, all victims of sexual assault, telling their stories.
The first woman told a story of the aftermath of a college party. Her boyfriend at the time let her ride home with one of her friends after she had been drinking. He took advantage of that and of her. She was left believing it was her own fault.
The second woman to tell her story began with her meeting a man at a club. They were together at his apartment when his advances became
forceful. It was not until she talked to a psychologist at her school that she figured out it was rape. This discovery led her into alcoholism and a string of multiple lovers.
The third woman explained that her family had just moved to TX and she was trying to make friends. At the time, she was 13 and she met an older boy of 17. He became her first boyfriend and showed kindness to her parents. One day, they were locked in her room when he antagonized her into having sex. She had never even had her period.
After the documentary, Clark showed a short clip on the meaning of consent.
Consent must be voluntary. If someone is incapacitated they cannot give consent. The absence of “no” does not mean “yes.” Consent must be a clear and conscious decision.
Next was a guest speaker, Shirley Marie Johnson, a victim of sexual assault and President and CEO of Exodus, Inc. She began by asking the audience their feelings on recent occurrences of public gures’ misogynistic comments.
She then went on with a few statistics.
Only three percent of rapists are convicted and serve their time. In Afghanistan, women are imprisoned for being raped. Women have a two- to-one chance of being raped versus getting breast cancer.
Johnson then told her story.
“In six years of marriage, about 900 times I woke up with my husband on top of me, doing things to me,” said Johnson.
She then explain how her church had told her she needed to go home and please her husband.
Once her time was up, a panel of three people got together in front of the audience to take questions.
The rst question was from the audience.
“Do you think more people are reporting sexual assault?”
“Since I’ve been on campus I have seen more people report it. The word’s getting out that it’s okay to talk about it,” said Angela Lawson, the Assistant Chief of Campus Police.
“Resources for victims and media
awareness are increasing,” said Lori Cutrell, Director of Human Resources. The next question was, “How can someone here report a sexual assault?” “You can report to anyone here on campus. There are upwards of 80 official reporters. Faculty is mandated to report by policy but not by federal
law,” said Lawson.
There are also step-by-step
instructions on how to report an assault and things to do and not to do directly after a sexual assault under Volunteer State Community College’s Policies and Procedures page on www.volstate. edu.
“What’s the difference between sexual assault and rape?” asked Clark.
“Sexual assault is touching and groping while rape is unwanted penetration,” said Lawson.
The next question was, “How many reports of sexual assault have there been on campus in the last three years?”
“There have been about 10 – 15 reports just to Human Resources,” said Cutrell.
The next question was directed at Johnson.
“How long was it before you decided to seek help?”
“I knew something was wrong but I was afraid to leave and be looked down on by the church. He wanted the divorce. I didn’t want to be the one to do that,” said Johnson.
The last question was, “How do the rape victims go on with their lives?” “Some find healing in helping others that have been through the same thing. It depends on the person,” said
Clark.
The seminar was left with a word
of advice.
“It’s never your fault,” said
Johnson.

Graduation deadline is almost here

by Cole Miller
Graduation is necessary to get a degree, and the priority deadline to graduate from Volunteer State Community during the Spring 2017 semester is Oct. 31. The final deadline for this is Feb.1. The process of applying to graduate is one very graduation packet,which can be picked up in the Hal Reed Ramer Administration Building in room 183 in the Office of Records and Registration. According to the Graduation Packet, students applying to graduate after the priority deadline must submit a Graduation Plan by the final deadline date in order to graduate during that semester, otherwise they will be moved to the next semester. This means that if a student misses the Feb. 1 deadline, they would graduate in the Summer 2017 semester, rather than the Spring 2017 semester. The priority and final deadlines for the Summer 2017 semester are March 15 and June 1, respectively. The packet also states that applicants must review all graduation requirements in their College Catalog for their program, check their progress by using
DegreeWorks, and to work closely with their advisor to make sure that all requirements have been or will be met in their anticipated graduated term. Vol State has two graduation ceremonies each year, at the end of the Fall and Spring semesters. All Summer graduates will participate in the following Fall ceremony. Although participation in the commencement is optional, it is strongly encouraged. All requirements for the respective program must be completed before the credential can be posted to the student’s transcript, or a diploma awarded to the student. For students that are graduating this semester, make sure to contact the bookstore by Nov. 11 to order your cap and gown for the ceremony. Graduation rehearsal is Dec. 9, at 10 am in the gymnasium located in the T. Wesley Pickel Field House. The ceremony will be held in the same place,on the following day,Dec. 10, in the gym. The phone number for the bookstore is 615-230-3636, or you can visit them in the Randy and Lois Wood Campus Center. The “Prospective Graduate Checklist”
lists several things that are needed to check off in order to graduate. They are: completion of all course requirements, all exit exam(s) taken, a minimum of 2.000 GPA unless the student is studying for an Associate of Science in Teaching which requires a GPA of 2.75, pay all financial obligations to the college including overdue fees and parking tickets, making sure all deadlines are met, and picking up the diploma on or after the designated dates of the semester graduation occurs for the respective student. Diplomas are available beginning on the following dates for Fall 2016, Spring 2017 and Summer 2017 semesters, respectively, Feb. 15, June 15, and Sept. 15. Graduates that cannot pick up their diploma can have their diploma mailed to them by providing a written release and pre-addressed, prepaid envelope to the Records office. “Make sure you meet with your advisor to discuss which classes you need to have credit for [in order to graduate],” said Amber Reagan, Graduation Analyst. “Everything you need to know, and the required forms are all on the graduation packets.”

The Alex Michael Band performs at Vol State’s annual Fall Festival

by Kailyn Fournier
Those who were at Fall Festival from 1 p.m. – 2 p.m., probably heard the music from the band playing in the Quad. That was the Alex Michael Band, a country music band from Nashville.
Volunteer State Community College got the band to perform at Fall Festival by attending the Association for the Promotion of Campus Activities (APCA) Conference where the band was being bid on by a variety of schools.
The band includes the lead, Alex Michael, along with Thomas Hassell on drums, Jonathan Warren on fiddle, Dean Green on bass, and Sam Van Fossen on lead guitar. They have been a band since 2011 and, aside from Tennessee, have played in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Texas.
At Vol State they opened with a cover of Dierks Bentley’s song, 5-1-5- 0, and over the course of the hour played 15 other songs. They had some technical difficulties, causing their lead microphone to cut out during the end of one of their songs, but the band did not let that faze them and finished the song as if nothing had happened. Once they were finished, they were able to resolve the issue
After that, Michael asked if their audience was okay with them going ahead and playing what Michael called their, “Show offy song,” before playing the tune for “Devil Went Down To Georgia.” For those not familiar with the song, it is particularly notable for its fiddle solos, which likewise show-cased Warren’s ability the most, but had a part for each member to show off.
Those who like line dancing should have been at the concert because towards the end of the show the band asked if anyone knew how to line dance. As a result
of their traveling and playing up North, where it is not common for people to line dance, they took “Copperhead Red” out of their set list. A few people knew how to, so the band played the song, and the few audience members who knew how to line dance taught those who were interested. “It’s always fun when the crowd gets into it,” said Michael.
Also in their song selections were two of the band’s original songs, “That Woman” and “Carousel.” Both songs are new and have yet to be recorded. They also took requests, which were “Dixieland Delight” by Alabama and their closing song, “Chicken Fried” by the Zac Brown Band.
“I was really impressed by the lead singer,” said Natalie White, Vice President of the Student Government Association, after the performance was over.
Those interested in The Alex Michael Band should check out their Facebook and their twitter page at @AlexMichaelBand. “For those who are interested in our stuff can go to our Bandcamp page and enter the promo code: “volstate” for 10 percent off on our music and merchandise,” said Warren. They also have their album on their Facebook page under the tab “Buy our music here.”
The band wanted to thank Ben Graves and Tabitha Sherrell for making it possible for them to be here.

Vol State officially releases crime statistics

By  Cole Miller

At Volunteer State Community College, the campus police are located below the Wood Campus Center.

Lisa Morris says, “In person at the Campus Police office of each site is the most efficient way. In the event something is realized after leaving campus, calling is permitted but the victim may be asked to come to campus police for a follow-up interview.”

According to the chart, there were 18 counts of larceny, or theft, in the year 2015, compared to the 19 theft offenses committed in 2011.

“There’s crime on campus?” said student Kevin Clow, “Everything seems so calm, like, I never would have guessed there is actual crime on campus.”

“I figured there is crime, you can’t be too sure, but I never would have known actual crime is committed here,” said Mariah Lynn Rodriguez, a student at Vol State.

“I feel safe for the most part, I mean as safe as any individual would feel at a school,” Rodriguez added.

Courtney Myatt, a student at Vol State, said, “It’s hard to form an opinion on crime when you don’t know it is going on.”

Campus Police can be found in the lower part of the Wood Campus Center, room 105, and be called at (615) 230-3595.

Students are encouraged to vote this election

By Michaela Marcellino

This has certainly been one of the most interesting election cycles in a long, long time. Students, it is time to make your voice heard.

According to a poll taken earlier this year by Pew Research, Millennials (aged 18-35) now make up the same portion of the electorate as Baby Boomers. We have a bigger voice then ever, and it is time to vote.

According to CBS, this next president will potentially appoint four Supreme Court Justices, while Business Insider reports that the the average number of appointments per President is 2.6.

The Supreme Court shapes the future of this nation by how they cast their votes. Ask yourself honestly: Are you happy with how your nation is being run, or do you want change?

Whether we like it or not, either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton will be our next president. They will both bring change.

Voting this election is so important because we have both the right and privilege in America to vote and to make our opinions known.

It is a responsibility that can never be taken for granted. A wise lady said recently something to the effect of, “If you do not vote, and end up not liking what is going on, you do not get to complain. You did not get out to vote.”

Voting is so important because you are the next generation of Americans. We can no longer be apathetic, and say it does not matter whether someone votes or not.

Think long, hard, and carefully about what you believe, and not what your parents, teachers, fellow classmates and friends believe. On November 8 and vote accordingly because not voting is a vote in itself.

The next step before election day is to make sure you are registered to vote. If you are not, you need to by October 11.

Tabitha Sherrell, Coordinator of Student Activities, said “Next week, SGA will be hosting a voter registration table Tuesday-Thursday from 12:45 p.m.-1:45 p.m. in the tiled dining room. We will also be hosting a ThinkFast Game Show on Wednesday, September 7, 2016 from 12:45PM-1:45PM and the theme of the game is ‘The Right to Vote.’ The League of Women Voters in Hendersonville will also be doing a table set-up on Tuesday, September 27 in honor of National Voter Registration Day. They will be in the tiled dining room from 10:30 a.m.—1:00 p.m.”

In addition, The Tennessee DMV website, http://www.dmv.org/tn-tennessee/voter-registration.php, states, “You can register to vote in person and by mail. First, complete the Mail-In Application for Voter Registration (Form SS-3010).

“This form is good for both in-person and by-mail registration. Next, either mail your form to your local county election commission or visit one of the following locations: County clerk’s office, Public libraries, Register of Deeds office, Department of Health, Departments of Human Services, Mental Health, Safety, and Veteran’s Affairs.”

If you are not sure if you are registered, you can check at the following website: https://tnmap.tn.gov/voterlookup/.  You can help shape the future of this nation, and you can make your voice heard.

Team Change scheduled to hold first meetings at VSCC

By Miguel Detillier

Team Change are planning to have their first meetings this week at Volunteer State Community College.

Le-Ellen Dayhuff, Assistant Professor of Math, said that these meetings will start from 2:20 p.m. on Sept. 7 and 8. Dayhuff also said that this club has not made any confirmation on where they will have their first meetings.

“We are also planning to have a community-wide stream clean-up event on Saturday, Sept. 17 at Mansker Creek in Goodlettsville from 9 a.m.-noon, and this event can count for TN Promise hours to students who are on the TN Promise scholarship,” said Kelly Ormsby, Assistant Professor of English. “Not only this event will help out our environment, but it will also help improve our water quality.”

Dayhuff said that this club will be advertising the stream clean up event at Team Change meetings this week.

“Besides getting involved in stream clean-ups, we have also participated in many events like Earth Hour when they handed out reusable metal water bottles to students who participated in Earth Hour, and at the Earth Day Festival when they did a drawing for students to win t-shirts made out of recycled plastic,” said Dayhuff. “We would also have speakers on campus like Jeff Barry who spoke out on energy savings, and sometimes we would also sometimes show films, and that we would also do workdays at the Vol State Community Garden and tree dedications to retired Vol State faculty members like when we grew two trees in dedication of Nancy Morris and Richard Harville, and we would also participate in tree plantings at parks with the Tennessee Environmental Council.”

Keith Bell, Associate Professor of Geography, said that Team Change is part of the Campus Sustainability Committee, and that the core mission of the Committee is to allocate funds procured from the Sustainable Campus Fee Program in a responsible and effective manner. Bell also said that the Campus Sustainability Committee seeks to reduce the rate at which Vol State contributes to the depletion and degradation of natural resources, and to increase the use of renewable resources, especially with the purchase of “Green Power Switch” energy from the Tennessee Valley Authority, and to adopt and expand other sustainable measures that can enhance the physical environment and decrease their ecological footprint, and to foster a culture of sustainability across campus through “green” philosophy and broad-based societal change.

“We hope that we can make campus sustainability efficient by encouraging our students to recycle and also by helping them protect our environment,” said Bell.

Ormsby confirms that this club is a great way for students to get involved around campus. Ormsby also said that she really enjoys working with students in Team Change off-campus on projects like stream clean-ups.

“Our goals for this club is to make the campus more sustainable and to help our faculty, staff, and students to be more aware of how our choices affect our environment,” said Dayhuff.