Man on the Quad 3/13/18 – Luckiest Thing To Happen To You

 

We here at The Settler have one goal: to let the student’s voice be heard. So we’re beginning a new segment called Man on the Quad to get students’ opinions, thoughts, and ideas. You can send your question ideas for this segment to aperham1@volstate.edu.

What is the luckiest thing that’s ever happened to you at Vol State?

There was a rainbow, and I found a four-leaf clover, and a leprechaun kicked me in the shin, and then I aced my exam. – A

Editor’s note: The Settler is unable to verify this information. However, we would be interested in your reports on any other sightings of the wee people.

My original song got used and might be on the album in jazz ensemble. – R

I found $5 in my lab on the floor once. – K

I finished last semester. – D

I met the love of my life three months in. – J

Going here. – A

I guess I got stopped and questioned by campus police for taking pictures around campus once. I guess that’s the unluckiest thing that happened to me at Vol State. – M

I guess like kindness like if you probably do something good for somebody then it’s probably gonna be good for you. If you’re nice to your teachers, they’re probably gonna be nice to you. – E

Librarian has worked at Vol State since the start

 

By Presley Green

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Picture by Presley Green

Marguerite Voorhies has worked in the library at Volunteer State Community College since the day it opened, July 1, 1971.

She started as a reference librarian, but has worked many different positions in the library from her favorite, catalog librarian, to her current position, library associate.

She has had a diverse career at Vol State. She worked under Virginia Thigpen, the lady that the current library is named after. She oversees the law library section, although she said books about law are not her favorite reading material.  

She spoke fondly of the coworkers and students she has worked with throughout the years.

“The people and students make me enjoy my job so much. Now, there is not much connection in the back, but I do try to smile at students who aren’t too busy,” she said, speaking of her workspace in the back of the library.

She has been an associate at Vol State through many changes and moves. She laughed while remembering the first library move from the administration building.

“Moving was an ordeal. We moved the books on book trucks with lots of volunteers. The whole campus was just mud. It was a rainy February,“ she said.

Voorhies shared one of her favorite books, “Black Stallion” by Walter Farley. When she was in fourth or fifth grade, she stayed up all night to finish the book, she said.

She recalled walking past the public library everyday on her walk home from school and stopping every few days when she ran out of reading material. Her summers as a child were spent reading.

Now, she does not read as much, but on her commute to her home in Colombia every weekend she listens to audiobooks.

Voorhies has rented a room from a former Vol State employee for 20 years. On the weekends, she goes to her home in Columbia where her grandnephews live. She drives home every Friday and back to Gallatin every Monday.

 

St. Patrick’s Day has a rich tradition in the US

 

By Katie Doll

St. Patrick’s Day is a global celebration of Irish culture on March 17. Parades and celebrations for this holiday are popular in American culture, but the history and traditions are important to note.

The Irish holiday originated as a Roman Catholic feast day to celebrate the patron saint of Ireland, Patrick. St. Patrick died March 17, 461, and was credited with bringing Christianity to Ireland.

While originally an Irish holiday, Irish immigrants moved to the United States and brought their traditions with them. Irish soldiers in the Revolutionary War held the first of the now famous St. Patrick’s Day parades.

Mike Cronin, a Dublin-based historian and Boston College professor, explained the holiday has changed over time to appeal to American celebrators.

“The tradition of celebrating St. Patrick’s Day grew across the U.S. and became a day that was also celebrated by people with no Irish heritage,” wrote Cronin, in his article in Time magazine.

The historian also explained the modern marketing strategies behind the holiday.

“By the 20th century, it was so ubiquitous that St. Patrick’s Day became a marketing bonanza,” wrote Cronin. “Greeting cards filled drugstores, imported Irish shamrocks (indeed anything green) showed up on T-shirts, and the food and drink that became associated with the day became bar promotions.”

Many original traditions of St. Patrick’s Day have stuck around, but few are purely American inventions, according to History.com.

The shamrock was a sacred plant that symbolized the rebirth of spring in ancient Ireland. Soon it became a symbol for Irish pride after the English banned the Irish language and Catholicism.

A traditional dish for Irish Americans to eat on St. Patrick’s Day is corned beef and cabbage. Cabbage has been an Irish food for a long time, but corned beef was an American alternative for Irish bacon that was too expensive for Irish immigrants.

One of the largest St. Patrick’s Day parades in America is in Savannah, Georgia. According to the official website of Savannah, Georgia, the parade will start at 10:15 a.m., Saturday, March 17, 2018. The parade will feature up to 15,000 people and 350 marching units.

 

New Movies at Thigpen Library

 

By Katie Doll

The Thigpen Library has a new selection of movies available to borrow. Here are reviews of five new movies you may enjoy.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)

The group of misfits known as the Guardians of the Galaxy are back after their 2014 origin movie. Peter Quill (Star-Lord) learns about his parentage in this epic Marvel movie. Audiences will be laughing at the spot-on comedic comebacks. Although not as fresh as the previous film, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 definitely has the charm and thrill to make a great sequel.

Wonder Woman (2017)

This origin story of the classic DC superhero gives an empowering and intense two hours and thirty minutes experience for audiences to return to any day. While on her sheltered Amazonian island, Diana Prince comes across an American pilot who informs her about the war to end all wars. Diana chooses to fight while adjusting to the outside world. Although the DC cinematic universe had a rough patch with their previous movies, Wonder Woman comes out as an entertaining and action-packed story.

The Fate of the Furious (2017)

The eighth installment of the action-packed serious, The Fate of the Furious follows Dominic and his wife as Dominic is forced to betray his friends after meeting a woman named Cipher. The rest must unite to stop Cipher and bring their friend home. This film is the first after Paul Walker’s death, and while the absence shows, the film still brings the action and cast chemistry.

Where the Wild Things Are (2009)

Feeling left out at home, nine-year old Max turns to the land of the Wild Things where he promises to be their leader and create a kingdom for the community. Imaginative and majestic, Where the Wild Things Are is a film for anyone who dreams of escaping the real world. This film will make your inner child come out and run wild.

Selena (1997)

Jennifer Lopez portrays the late musician, Selena Quintanilla, in this biographical drama. The film follows her life growing up in a musical Mexican-American family and finding love with her guitarist. This film is a warm and moving tribute to the beloved performer.

Photos via imdb.com

Spring break fun that won’t break the bank

 

By Tayla Courage

Are you looking to have an eventful, yet inexpensive spring break? Here’s a list of five staycation options that won’t break the bank.

Nashville Public Library Community Yoga (March 3 & 10)

If you are looking to relax and destress, the Nashville Public Library offers free Saturday morning yoga sessions as a part of their “Be Well at the NPL” campaign. Yoga will take place in Hadley Park from 10:15 – 11:15 a.m. According to the Nashville Public Library’s website, people of all ages and abilities are welcome to participate in this beginner-friendly activity. The sessions will feature both breathing and stretching exercises, and attendees may choose to borrow a provided mat or bring their own.

The First Saturday Art Crawl (March 3)

If you are more interested in the downtown artistic scene, the city of Nashville hosts a free art crawl on the first Saturday of each month. Over twenty galleries participate in this monthly event, many of which offer free wine and refreshments, according to the Nashville Downtown Partnership’s website. Art crawlers will have the opportunity to view the works and exhibits of both local and world-renowned artists. Parking options for this event can be found here.

The Frist Center

If you happened to miss the art crawl, Nashville’s Frist Center offers free admission to college students with a valid student ID on Thursday and Friday nights from 5 – 9 p.m., excluding Frist Fridays. As of now there are three exhibitions available for viewing, but the Frist is constantly rotating its collections.

The Country Music Hall of Fame

The Country Music Hall of Fame benefits locals by offering free admission for youths aged 18-or-under from Davidson, Cheatham, Robertson, Rutherford, Sumner, Williamson, and Wilson Counties as a part of its Community Counts program. According to the website, an adult Nashville Public Library cardholder and a plus-one from Davidson County can receive free admission by picking up a Community Counts Passport from any of the NPL locations. Proof of residency is required. The Hall of Fame is open every day from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

The Tennessee State Museum

If you’re interested in learning more about Tennessee’s history, the Tennessee State Museum offers free admission to the public Tuesday – Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.  The museum’s permanent exhibitions are free year-round, but the changing exhibitions may be charged, according to tnmuseum.org. Visitors may also explore the Military Museum or take a guided tour of the State Capitol free of charge. Hours may vary.