Study shows economic impact Vol State has on graduates

 

By Ashley Perham

Graduates from Volunteer State Community College’s class of 2016 could potentially earn $470,000 more than workers with only a high school diploma, according to a recent study.

As a whole, the 991 students from the 2016 graduating class have an earning potential of $465.8 million more than workers with only a high school diploma in their working lifetime, according to the study.

This study, “An Analysis of the College’s Economic and Social Impact,” was conducted for Vol State by Knoxville educational consultant Fred H. Martin, according to Vol State’s website.

The study also discussed the social impacts getting a degree from Vol State could have on graduates’ lives, including a greater likelihood of attending a four-year college, improved health habits, increased civic involvement, reduced poverty rates, and increased home ownership levels.

While similar studies have been done about Vol State, this study was the first to look into how a college education could impact a specific graduating class, said Eric Melcher, coordinator of public relations and marketing at Vol State. Continue reading

Snow and ice can delay or close campuses

 

Campus-snow 1-06 097 corrected

Photo by Vol State PR

By Presley Green

Snow and ice can delay classes or close campuses of Volunteer State Community College.

A delay means that classes meeting before the time given in the delay will not be held, according to the Vol State student handbook. Labs may still be held during a delay. The instructor will notify the class through the eLearn system.

If a campus is closed, no labs or classes will meet. The closing of public high schools does not affect the closing of Vol State, according to the handbook.

Closures and delays will vary from campus to campus. Alerts will be posted on Vol State’s website and social media. Students can also be alerted through email or Vol State Text Alerts. Continue reading

CAB to host “Wanna Make S’more Friends?”

 

By Tayla Courage

Volunteer State Community College’s Campus Activities Board will be hosting a social café event in the Mary Nichols Dining Room A Jan. 23 at 12:45 p.m.

The event titled “Wanna Make S’more Friends?” will be open to any students interested in becoming more involved in student life on campus.

“The idea is to spark a conversation about this event and if they would like to see more events of its kind,” according to an email from Crystal Sloss, chairperson of the Campus Activities Board. Continue reading

Vol State announces nursing degree program

 

By Lauren Whitaker

Volunteer State Community College has announced that they will offer an associate degree program in nursing beginning in the fall 2019 semester.

Vol State has considered an associate degree program in nursing for eight years, according to Elvis Brandon, dean of health sciences at Vol State.

“We have actually had the proposal ready twice, but because of the cost of the program, we decided not to move forward with it the first two times,” Brandon said.

The degree is designed to stand alone. Depending on schools with a bridge program from the associate in nursing to the bachelor’s in nursing, there will be the option for students pursuing this degree to transfer, according to Brandon.

The program will have a limit on the amount of students admitted into it.

“Students will have to complete all the prerequisite classes, and obviously, it will be competitive based on grade point average,” said Brandon.

“It’s about time that Vol State got a nursing program,” said Anna Lawson, Vol State student.

“I had hoped they would start one in time for me to go to it, but I’m so excited for future students to have this opportunity. Vol State is a great school, and I’m so glad that they are giving their students more opportunities in education,” Lawson said.

Despite a bachelor’s degree in nursing being recommended, students graduating with an associate degree in nursing can work as a registered nurse, a travel nurse, a school nurse, a psychiatric nurse, and a neonatal intensive care nurse, according to nursing.org.

Students can expect to spend 18-24 months in school before graduating with an associate degree in nursing; and after earning this degree, students are required to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses before becoming a registered nurse, according to Rasmussen.edu.

Academic resources available to students

 

By Ashley Perham

  1.  Thigpen Library - Thigpen Library itself is an academic resource. On the second floor of the building, students will find thousands of physical books which can be sent to any Volunteer State Community College campus.
  2. Study rooms - Students looking for a space to study or work as group have study rooms available. Scattered throughout the library are individual study spaces, including a room designated as “silent.”
  3. IT Department - The college’s information technology department has an open computer lab on the first floor of the library with PCs, Macs, scanners, and printers.
  4. Textbook library - A limited number of textbooks are available for use in the library. Each campus library has textbooks, but there are not textbooks for every class. The services page on the library’s website links to information on textbooks and other resources available for students including technology lending.
  5. Library website - The digital gateway to the library is their website (volstate.edu/library). Here students will find a link to the databases and research guides. The research guides, curated by librarians, link students to the credible resources needed for their assignment.
  6. Library databases - The library provides access to approximately 100 databases, which are available 24/7. Students can use these databases to complete assignments or gain a better understanding of a topic discussed in class. Databases consist of ebooks, streaming videos, and articles from journals, magazines, and newspapers.
  7. Online resources - Students can use the library’s “New York Times Online” subscription to set up a free account and stay up to date with world events through their computer or a phone app. Lynda.com and LearningExpress Library can help students with the skills they need to be a successful student at Vol State.
  8. Research help - Help with research is available in many formats in addition to the library research guides. Review a video tutorial, chat online 24/7, or stop by a library on your campus for help.
  9. NoodleTools – NoodleTools is a website that helps students write papers by organizing their notes and correctly citing their sources. Access to NoodleTools is provided for Vol State students through the library website.
  10. Learning Commons - The Learning Commons in the first floor of the library. The Commons offers tutoring in math, science, reading, and writing. Math tutoring is available from the Learning Support level up to calculus. Chemistry and physics tutoring is also available. Students can also get help with reading and writing through practice essays and reading lessons and tests.
  11. Language Center - The Language Center at Vol State in SRB 205 is available to give students help with different aspects of writing essays such as thesis development, grammar, and style. French and Spanish tutors and resources are also available upon request.

LIBRARY HOURS – 615-230-3400

Monday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Thursday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Friday – 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday – 8:00 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LEARNING COMMONS HOURS – 615-230-3676

Monday – 7:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Tuesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Thursday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Friday – 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday – 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LANGUAGE CENTER HOURS – 615-230 – 3397

Monday – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday – 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Wednesday – 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Thursday – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday – 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

 

 

Starry Night to be performed at Vol State

By: Cole Miller
The annual Christmas program at Volunteer State Community College is coming up.
Every year at Vol State near the end of the Fall semester, the music department puts on a program.
It will be held in the Noble C. Caudill Hall in the Ellen and Will Wemyss Auditorium on Friday, Dec. 2 and Saturday, Dec. 3 at 7:30 p.m. on both nights.
The event is completely open to the public, and students and faculty are encouraged to invite family and friends.
It is completely free for students to come and enjoy the performance, just show your student ID at the door.
In addition, anyone who wishes to donate to the program for future performances are welcome to do so.
“This year is going to be our best show yet. The theme is ‘A Starry Night’, [as it is] a nocturnal theme, a thematic ideal of stars, [literally] a starry night.”
The idea is a brainchild of myself. We will have more than just Christmas music, as the ensembles are very diverse.”
There will be Native American flautists, and several ensembles [consisting] of jazz, rhythm, rock, and blues.”
The group Vol State Showstoppers will be performing ‘Star Carols Medley’, with the finale being ‘A Shining Star’ by Earth, Wind and Fire.”
I hope every student who enjoys and appreciates music will come and enjoy the show”, said Professor James Story, Chair of the Music Arts Department.
Professor Story also added that if any student is interested in joining one of these ensembles for next year’s show, to schedule an appointment to see him in his office in the Steinhauer-Rogan-Black Humanities Building.
He is looking for brass, percussion and woodwind players in particular.
“I attended the Christmas program last year, and it was very entertaining. I hope I can go this year, but work hates me.”
I am looking forward to hearing my favorite Earth, Wind and Fire song ever, other than on commercials during the holidays.”
Mr. Story really knows what he’s doing, and even the shows of his I have seen outside of Vol State are just awesome.”
Christmas time is the best time of the year, for music, food, and human interaction. [Not only do] I hope I can go, but I hope that all students that enjoy this time of year as much as I do will go and enjoy this show.” said Dakota Rogers, a student at Vol State.
CDs of the performance will be five dollars and can be purchased through the music program.
For more information, contact the Office of Humanities at
(615) 230 – 3202.

Spoken word artist NAV comes to Vol State

By: Miguel Detillier
Spoken-word poet Navpreet Sachdev, better known as NAV, spoke at Volunteer State Community College on Nov. 16.
This event took place at the Mary Cole Nichols Dining Room B in the Randy and Lois Wood Campus Center and lasted from 12:45-1:45 p.m. as part of International Education Week.
Before NAV read his poems to start this event, he suggested everybody in the audience to ask questions in between or after his spoken-word pieces.
NAV started this event by reading a poem called “Defined” that talks about him dealing with racial discrimination in his life.
Next, NAV read “The Apology” after he told a story about being rejected by a girl when he tried to ask for her number. This poem is about him struggling to date a girl and him being a terrible flirter toward women.
NAV then talks about negativity as one of his biggest life struggles, and that he tends to struggles to live to the fullest when he has negative thoughts in his mind. NAS also talked about dealing with his negative thoughts by doing the Think Positive Campaign on social media, especially when he shares positive messages on Snapchat and Instagram with #pathtopositivity, which lead to him reading a poem called “Scars” that talks about the agony that has affected him in his life.
Next, NAV read “What I’m About,” and encouraged the students to help him bring rhythm to his poem by clapping their hands and stomping their feet.
NAV also talked about him becoming a poet by explaining that his breakup with his girlfriend put him in a lot of emotional stress which eventually lead to him starting to write his own poems suicidal. NAV also explained that once he started to write poetry, it compelled him to write and perform his own poems in college and to learn more about the techniques of poetry from watching and studying videos of poets on YouTube.
Next, NAV read “The Politics of Facebook” that talked about the problems of being on Facebook. Afterwards NAV read “I am Singh” and “Full-Time” which both talked about his personal faith.
Finally, NAV read “Thank You Come Again” about his father who grew up in India to close this event.
“This has been a wonderful way for students to participate in an international activity right on campus,” said Anne-Marie Ruttenbur, Coordinator of International Education. “Not only did they get to hear great poetry but they also got to learn about someone from a different culture.”
“I think the event did really well,” said Tabitha Sherrell, Coordinator of Student Activities. “NAV did a fantastic job, and I wish I would’ve love to see more people to come see him perform, but it was still a really good event.”
NAV said that Vol State had great energy and was a lot of fun. NAV also said that the students seemed to be engaged in this event and appeared to enjoy the show.

Weddings Around the World Exhibit at Vol State Community College

Kailyn Fournier
As a part of Volunteer State Community College’s celebration of International Education Week, there was a display in the Carpeted Dining Hall over weddings around the world on Nov. 16th.
There were various tables set up describing wedding traditions in various cultures.
According to Tabitha Sherrell, the concept of weddings around the world came from a woman, Seemi Rizvi, who volunteered to come to Vol State and give students free Henna Tattoos.
The event was then based around the fact that Henna is a wedding tradition in India.
Likewise, the event was centered on Rizvi’s table, which brought in a steady inflow of students from 11 p.m. – 2 p.m. Two students, Abby Humbest and Hunter Gooch, visited the booth, and got their tattoos.
Humbest learned about the event a week before after seeing the fliers for International Education Week on the tables of the cafeteria and remembered after seeing Rizvi’s table set up.
When she sat down, Rizvi just started going to work before Humbest could tell her what she wanted, but Rizvi’s design ended up being every close to what she had in mind.
“I liked the fact she was able to pick up on what I wanted,” said Humbest.
Gooch learned about the event from a friend who wanted to get a Henna tattoo done for themselves.
After he saw their tattoo, Gooch decided to get one as well. He didn’t have a good idea on what design he wanted, so when he sat down, “I let her do what she needed to do,” said Gooch.
She said she started doing this after she had a client who had come in for an original design and just based on how she felt came up with a Japanese appearing design.
It turned out that the girl had Japanese heritage. “After that, I just decided to tell people what I am feeling,” said Rizvi.
“She said my tattoo was a strange one to her and that I create beautiful, meaningful stuff and that I would be a bridge between two things,” said Gooch.
For those who are interested in the Henna tattoos, they can find Rizvi’s business page on Facebook if they look up “Seemi’s Henna Body Art.”
The booths that surrounded Rizvi’s table had information on other cultures.
Some traditions that were mentioned included the Guatemalan tradition of the groom’s mother placing a white bell filled with grains to welcome the couple to the reception, and the German tradition of having the couple work together to saw a log in half.
Respectively, the traditions intend to wish prosperity for the future of the couple, and test their ability to work together.
In front of the display were some passports that were free to take as well as some flyers for Tennessee Consortium for International Studies (TnCIS), a study abroad program for Tennessee students.

Humorist Tom Lehrer Tribute Concert a Success

By: Michaela Marcellino
The Music Department of Volunteer State Community College had their concert, “Too Many Songs by Tom Lehrer (as if that was even possible…)” on Monday, Nov. 7.
This event was a tribute to political humorist and musician Tom Lehrer. It included both faculty and staff from several Vol State music appreciation classes.
The music was upbeat, funny and lively, and seemed to keep the audience laughing the entire time.
The concert included 13 Tom Lehrer songs performed live, as well as videos with Tom Lehrer himself singing—New Math and The Elements—to begin and end the event.
The songs performed live included The Masochism Tango, So Long Mom (a song for World War III), She’s My Girl, and Poisoning Pigeons in the Park. Some of the songs were cynical, yet hilarious takes on political themes, and some were just humorous takes on life in general.
“I thought the show was fabulous, everybody did what they were supposed to do…I think the audience] liked it, they seemed to have a really great time.
“You know, I wanted to give them permission to be as ridiculous and rowdy and crazy as possible, because it is that kind of show. The performers were great.
“Half of them were Mark Granlunds students, and I thought they [all] did great. Ben Troxler [who performed in the show] was a student of mine in 1999, when I first was here [at Vol State].
“[My favorite part of the show] was mine! The song I Hold Your Hand in Mine is extremely funny,” said Nancy Slaughter, associate professor of music, who helped coordinate as well as performed in the show.
All the performers seemed to really enjoy themselves. Even Vol State’s President, Dr. Jerry Faulkner, attended.
“[The show] was great fun. It was very entertaining, and the students did a great job. I do not know if I had a singular favorite part, it was all so good. I do not think I could choose one over the other,” said Faulkner.
“The show went really good, I think everyone did really well. I hope [the audience] was entertained. I think everyone did better than they thought they would do,” said Josie Doyka, a Vol State student who performed in the show.
“[My favorite part of the show] was hitting myself with a tambourine!” said Noah Perkins, another student who performed in the show.
Another faculty member who performed in the show as well as helped coordinate it was Mark Granlund, who teaches voice at Vol State.
“I was so pleased with the students, and their abilities to do what they do. I could not be more proud of them.
“The audience was into it, every bit it of it. They enjoyed it, and laughed at times. I hope they learned to laugh at themselves and laugh with other people. [The concert] gives [students] an opportunity to learn and grow [as] a person. They learn to be their own people,” said Granlund.
The concert was a fun time for everyone involved, and gave the audience the rare and welcome chance to just relax and have fun for a little while.