President’s Ambassadors program mold student’s into leaders

The President’s Ambassadors is a full ride scholarship given to five girls and five boys at Volunteer State Community College.
In order to receive this scholarship, a student has to take 12 or more hours with a 3.0 or higher GPA. A student who is qualified for this scholarship is invited to apply.
Then, the student must fill out the application that was mailed to them and submit the application by the deadline.

Once applications are reviewed, students that are selected will be notified for their first interview. At the end of the interview process, the final ambassadors will be chosen.
This student is required to have 40 hours a semester and 20 hours of community work around Vol State, which can be accomplished over the summer.

Being in the office, having a campus tour or participating in events/ activities goes toward those hours. These students will partake as servant leaders to the president.

“Vol State needs to have a student representative to make a positive impact on the future students visiting,” said Sydny Simpson, admission specialist.
Lindsey Maxwell is a President’s Ambassador. She went through this process and was selected for this academic year.

Maxwell has maintained a 4.0 GPA and said she enjoys being an ambassador for Vol State because it enables her to be an extension and representative of the college’s mission to the local community.
She said she is passionate about encouraging prospective students by giving campus tours and working with various events on campus.

“I have definitely grown as an individual by being a part of this program,” said Maxwell. “It has given me opportunities to better not only Vol State, but the community and myself.”
Garrett Moore is a President’s Ambassador. He was selected for this academic year and has accumulated a 3.68 GPA through his journey at Vol State.
Moore said that through his many experiences he has had the best two years of his life so far.

“I love meeting new people and helping others. The Ambassador Program has definitely provided an awesome avenue to pursue,” said Moore.
Other events that the President’s Ambassadors have been involved with include: Hispanic Fiesta, TN Promise sign-ups, Sumner County College Night and career fair.

“The Ambassador Program is in its eleventh year at the college.  Students selected for the program are given the opportunity to learn more about themselves and develop leadership skills while giving back to the community and college.

“We keep in touch with many of the Ambassador alums and enjoy watching them continue to grow and succeed after they leave Vol State,” said Tim Amyx, director of Admissions and College Registrar.

The Other Wes Moore book study

For its second year, Volunteer State Community College welcomes One Book, One Community. One Book, One Community is a partnership between the Vol State Thigpen Library and the public libraries of Gallatin, Hendersonville, Portland, Westmoreland, and White House.
New York Times bestseller “The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates” written by Wes Moore is the selection of 2015.
It explores the life of young Moore and is often relatable to urban America.
It follows the life and the struggles of inner city kids, from drugs and abuse, all the way to absent parents and lack of structure.
Since being published in April of 2010, this book has become an urban American phenomenon, with Moore being placed on Ebony’s Annual Power 100 List, and now hosting Beyond Belief on Oprah’s Own Network.
Now this book is gaining popularity all over the world, and sparked an interest in Cindy Chanin, assistant professor of English, who referred Vol State to the book.
Moore’s story may have started in Maryland, but now it has reached the desks of local students and our community.
Kay Grossberg, associate professor of English, is one of eight who are teaching this book this year.
“One Book, One Community is a program made to establish a connection to reading to college students to the community,” said Grossberg.
In concurrence with the book read, Vol State will also hold a special lecture series that is free and open to the public.

The lecure series is as follows:

Feb. 10: Film: “American Promise”, two showings- noon and 5 p.m., Thigpen library.

Feb. 16: Effects and possible solutions to the issue of “deadbeat dads”, 12:30 p.m., Nichols Dining Room, Wood Campus Center.

Feb. 24: Tense relationships between the police and the African-American community and possible solutions, 12:30 p.m. Nichols Dining Room, Wood Campus Center.

March 2: The effects of Hip-Hop on Society, 9 a.m., Pickel Field House.

March 19: Fear of (or low expectations of) young African-American males and possible solutions, 12:30 p.m., Nichols Dining Room, Wood Campus.

March 24: Final discussion: Lessons learned and where do we go from here? 6 p.m., Thigpen Library.

Changes coming to African American Student Union

One of Volunteer State Community College student clubs, African American Student Union (AASU), is going through changes.
Zachary Ford, former vice president, stepped down and transferred authoritative power to Ashlyn Challenger.
Challenger says she is a little “nervous” but “excited” about being the new president.
She said she is looking forward to learning new things and influencing students in a positive way.
“Our goal for the semester is to … empower one another and to promote positivity,” said Challenger.
February is Black History Month and with its arrival, the Gallatin campus has events lined up each week.
This Wednesday, Feb. 4, Poet Odd Rod will perform in the Mary Cole Nichols Tiled Dining Room at 12:30 p.m.
He will share his personal story of overcoming the odds.
The annual Soul Food Luncheon, AASU’s most largely attended event, is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 11 at noon in the Carpeted Dining Room.
“This event is open to all Vol State students and the focus will be Black Literary Figures,” said Ford.
Beginning at 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 19, Lunch and Learn will take place in the Carpeted Dining Room.
Attendees are encouraged to bring their own lunches.
Drinks and desserts will be provided by the office of Student Life and Diversity Initiatives (SLDI).
Directly afterward there will be a concert.
The annual Black History Recognition Luncheon is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 25, at 12:30 p.m. in the Carpeted Dining Room.
Students must RSVP prior to the event through SLDI in the Wood Campus Center, Room 215.
In addition to these on-campus events, AASU also has regular scheduled meetings each Monday at 10 a.m. and Thursday at 12:30 p.m. in the student lounge, located in first floor of the Wood Campus Center.
This is subject to change “depending on the schedule of who joins the club on Welcome Days,” said Challenger. According to Colossians 3:13 – 14, “Continue putting up with one another and forgiving one another freely even if anyone has a cause for complaint against another. But besides all these things, clothe yourselves with love, for it is a perfect bond of union.”
AASU is currently seeking a Vice President and a Treasurer. If interested, stop by the table on Welcome Day, this Thursday, between 10 a.m. and noon or email achallenger@volstate.edu.

Groundbreaking Ceremony dedicates new building for Humanities

Volunteer State Community College had a Groundbreaking Ceremony on Jan. 16 for the soon-to-be built Humanities building.

The event was in the Mary Cole Nichols Carpeted Dining Room from 7:30-8:45 a.m. and began with a breakfast buffet.

The Vol State Jazz Ensemble, including James Story, chair of Visual and Performing Arts and Ben Graves, instructor of Music, performed in a corner of the dining room.

Lauren Shifflett Wiese, a Studio Art major, displayed and executed her charcoal sketches of the event.

Pam Nixon and Leanne Tucker, Vol State students, presented and produced examples of their printmaking work.

There were also layout designs of the three different floors in the new building and computer generated pictures of the displayed.

Dr. Jerry Faulkner, president of Vol State, mentioned in his opening statements that the new humanities building had been a vision for the school for 12 years.

It is going to be the largest building on the Gallatin campus.

“I did not know that it was [88,345] square feet. That’s amazing. So I’m very excited to see the school really expanding we have all this wonderful campus. And I’m glad to see that the humanities will actually have a home finally,” said Weise.

Some of the features in the new Humanities building include; 23 classrooms, 56 offices, 11 collaborative study areas, an outdoor amphitheater and courtyard, computer labs, art gallery and a recording studio.

“I’m very excited that it’s going to be the biggest building on site. Finally all the arts, fine arts, music, our theater gets to be in one building. I think it’s going to be easier and better for collaboration reasons in all respects,” said Kealani Hughes, student president of Delta Psi Omega, Vol State’s theater club.

“I think it’s exciting. I think it says a lot for Vol State in terms of where we’re going as a college and there’s a lot for the community as well,” said Lauren Collier, executive assistant to the office of the president.

Tyler Dunn, a Vol State student, was the first to speak at the ceremony after Faulkner’s opening remarks. Dunn spoke about his experience as an Entertainment Media Production major and how the new building will benefit students.

“The new Humanities building has so much potential and I’m so excited for the opportunity and achievement to come … not just for me but for future students, ” said Dunn in his speech.

Other speakers at the event included Bea Thompson of Moody Nolan and Tom Lampe from Messer Construction who provided more information about the process and how the new building will improve the Vol State campus.

“It is a very good idea to have all these people to come together to collaborate and that is why it’s so beautiful. … It’s not so great that all the arts are scattered out,” said William York, a member of Delta Psi.

The completion date for the building is expected to take place in Summer 2016.

“As soon as you open the doors you’re going to be in the mood to achieve,” said Cindy Fox, a theater major.

 

Math and Science Dean Nancy Morris to retire after 35 years of service

Nancy Morris, dean of the Math and Science division, has announced her retirement from Volunteer State Community College, after 35 years of service to the school. Her official last day is July, 31 of this year.

Morris said she started at Vol State when she was recruited from teaching in Sumner County.

“I was in White House Junior High and I felt like I had more to share, in content, with students at a higher level. I came to Vol state in 1980 and I’ve always been a member of the faculty but in a series of changing roles. Coordinator of Biology and then Science department chair, and then dean,” said Morris.

Before she arrived at Vol State, Morris said that she did her undergraduate degree of chemistry at Austin Peay State University, before doing her graduate program at Vanderbilt where she became interested in teaching.

“I found the research in my graduate program of study, at Vanderbilt, so interesting that I really felt compelled to share that interest and insight with other folks,” said Morris. “Once you learn to teach yourself, then every discipline is available to you. You can become a scholar in almost any area that you choose. … We begin learning isolated skill sets and you realize, at my age, that little job or that little experience that you had way back when, in college, pays off with this kind of mind set.”

Morris said that the diversity of opportunity is what she has enjoyed the most at Vol State.

Morris also said that she admires her fellow staff members.

“Vol State’s greatest resource here, is its human resource. This is an amazing compilation of educators and professional staff and administrators. You know we often don’t realize what we have until we lose it or we are gone, “ said Morris. “What I quickly realized is that beyond teaching content, we are really teaching human beings. You are changing someone’s life and shaping insights in the context of a given course.”

Dr. Jeffery Kent, professor of Biology, said he that thinks Morris has done an outstanding job.

“Sometimes [being a] dean is a thankless job, because nobody is going to agree entirely with what is being done, but I think she has handled the job with enthusiasm. She has relished trying to move our division forward with new initiatives to try and improve what we do, especially in sciences, as well in Math,” said Kent.

Dr. Robert Carter, Science department chair, also said he thinks Morris has done fantastic job in her role as a dean.

“She has improved the quality of the education, the motivation of the faculty, new invitations in what we do, new types of science that we do, new types of math. We’ve had a lot of challenges. Redesigning our math program, dealing with developmental studies and learning support. These are very, very, challenging types of things, particularly for a dean to juggle from all those different angles,” said Carter. “A great part of my success is due to her. I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for her, I wouldn’t be as good of an instructor, I wouldn’t be as good of a chair, as I am. So I rely on her for basically every aspect of what I do, be it everything from encouragement to actual, her getting on the phone and making sure I get what I need.”

Morris said that education should continue to be practiced and celebrated.

“Realizing the difference that education makes in your life is sort of a review mirror realization. You don’t know how important it is until you have done it. I think we, as a public, as a society, have to do whatever it takes to support folks in their academic journey so that education is not the thing that prevents anyone from reaching their full potential and achieving all they can be and being the most productive and healthy individuals and citizens. We need to be an educated and literate society,” said Morris.

When asked what she considered her greatest achievement in her time at Vol State, Morris said it is difficult to focus on a certain one.

“I wouldn’t say that there is any great personal achievement. I would say there are many small personal contributions to the greater good. It’s been my privilege to help identify and recommend some exceptional faculty who have joined this community. It’s been my great privilege to help design new science labs that were constructed on this campus. It has been my great privilege to work with my peers in creating this phenomenal undergraduate research program [and] redesigning the math curriculum,” said Morris.

As for what she plans to do after retirement, Morris said that she plans to travel.

“I will be going to France in September and ill be going to Guatemala in January of 2016. I have some remodeling projects already scheduled in my home, and there are some opportunities that I will pursue in Kentucky, in my hometown. I have family there so I am there often.”

Dr. Kimberly Caldwell, mathematics department chair, said her thoughts on Morris, and how she thinks Morris has benefited the college.

“Dean Nancy Morris has dedicated her life’s work to VSCC in her roles as faculty member, advisor, mentor and administrator. She is a true academician.

“For 35 years, she has gone above and beyond in giving of her time, talents and energies to the college. Nancy has worked tirelessly, leading the Math and Science Division into the national spotlight.

“She has mentored students and colleagues alike, guiding them toward academic excellence. She has touched our lives in many ways both personally and professionally.

“She has been a champion on many fronts; promoting women in higher education; undergraduate research, National Science Foundation grants and programs devoted to promoting girls in math and science.

“She leaves a giant footprint at the college. Her legacy and contributions to VSCC will endure for many years to come,” said Caldwell.

Welcome Day brings students together

Lauren Cieler// Staff Writer

Volunteer State Community College is hosting a Welcome Day on Friday, Jan. 30, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. in the Mary Cole Nichols Carpeted Dining Room.

Welcome Day is an event where Vol State student clubs can promote their organizations to students and faculty. It is a way to know what extra curricular activities are available at Vol State.

“It is a great way to meet new people that have the same interest as one another,” said Lori Miller, secretary II in the Office of Student Life and Diversity Initiatives
(SLDI).

Each club will have a tri-fold poster board with information about their club including: their first club meeting, meeting dates and times throughout the semester, members of the club, events hosted by the club and pictures.

“It is a great way to see what kind of clubs are offered here,” said Myah Dennis, Vol State student

“I like Welcome Day because I like that the officers and members interact and encourage students to join their clubs,” said Tabitha Sherrell, coordinator of Student Activities in SLDI.

All are welcome to attend and talk with the organizations of Vol State.

 

Supplemental Instruction offers tutoring to empower students

Lauren Cieler// Staff Writer

Volunteer State Community College offers a program called Supplemental Instruction (SI), which helps students who are struggling in certain subjects and cuts studying time in half.

SI forms study groups to encourage students to become model figures for other students or the class.

“Students empowering other students to succeed is a great experience to see,” said Toni Murad, Supplemental Instruction coordinator.

These study groups form discussions to help struggling students to see how they can improve in the class.

SI leaders are students who have been successful in these subjects and are hired by their excellence, big hearts, and their ability to communicate with other students.

“When students come back to show her their grades it’s an overwhelming feeling knowing that anything can happen,” said Sandra Hitchcox, an SI aid.

Supplemental Instruction is available at any time to students in classrooms, over Skype, or Sunday sessions.

SI is all over the United States and Vol State is the first college in Tennessee to offer the program.

“I really like the Supplemental Instruction because we talk about our strengths and weaknesses on how we can learn better,” said Courtney Warren, a middle college student. “I will be using SI more for the classes that I will be specifying in so, when I graduate from high school college will be a little easier for me.”