Academic resources available to students

 

By Ashley Perham

  1.  Thigpen Library - Thigpen Library itself is an academic resource. On the second floor of the building, students will find thousands of physical books which can be sent to any Volunteer State Community College campus.
  2. Study rooms - Students looking for a space to study or work as group have study rooms available. Scattered throughout the library are individual study spaces, including a room designated as “silent.”
  3. IT Department - The college’s information technology department has an open computer lab on the first floor of the library with PCs, Macs, scanners, and printers.
  4. Textbook library - A limited number of textbooks are available for use in the library. Each campus library has textbooks, but there are not textbooks for every class. The services page on the library’s website links to information on textbooks and other resources available for students including technology lending.
  5. Library website - The digital gateway to the library is their website (volstate.edu/library). Here students will find a link to the databases and research guides. The research guides, curated by librarians, link students to the credible resources needed for their assignment.
  6. Library databases - The library provides access to approximately 100 databases, which are available 24/7. Students can use these databases to complete assignments or gain a better understanding of a topic discussed in class. Databases consist of ebooks, streaming videos, and articles from journals, magazines, and newspapers.
  7. Online resources - Students can use the library’s “New York Times Online” subscription to set up a free account and stay up to date with world events through their computer or a phone app. Lynda.com and LearningExpress Library can help students with the skills they need to be a successful student at Vol State.
  8. Research help - Help with research is available in many formats in addition to the library research guides. Review a video tutorial, chat online 24/7, or stop by a library on your campus for help.
  9. NoodleTools – NoodleTools is a website that helps students write papers by organizing their notes and correctly citing their sources. Access to NoodleTools is provided for Vol State students through the library website.
  10. Learning Commons - The Learning Commons in the first floor of the library. The Commons offers tutoring in math, science, reading, and writing. Math tutoring is available from the Learning Support level up to calculus. Chemistry and physics tutoring is also available. Students can also get help with reading and writing through practice essays and reading lessons and tests.
  11. Language Center - The Language Center at Vol State in SRB 205 is available to give students help with different aspects of writing essays such as thesis development, grammar, and style. French and Spanish tutors and resources are also available upon request.

LIBRARY HOURS – 615-230-3400

Monday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Thursday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Friday – 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday – 8:00 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LEARNING COMMONS HOURS – 615-230-3676

Monday – 7:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Tuesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Thursday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Friday – 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday – 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LANGUAGE CENTER HOURS – 615-230 – 3397

Monday – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday – 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Wednesday – 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Thursday – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday – 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

 

 

Starry Night to be performed at Vol State

By: Cole Miller
The annual Christmas program at Volunteer State Community College is coming up.
Every year at Vol State near the end of the Fall semester, the music department puts on a program.
It will be held in the Noble C. Caudill Hall in the Ellen and Will Wemyss Auditorium on Friday, Dec. 2 and Saturday, Dec. 3 at 7:30 p.m. on both nights.
The event is completely open to the public, and students and faculty are encouraged to invite family and friends.
It is completely free for students to come and enjoy the performance, just show your student ID at the door.
In addition, anyone who wishes to donate to the program for future performances are welcome to do so.
“This year is going to be our best show yet. The theme is ‘A Starry Night’, [as it is] a nocturnal theme, a thematic ideal of stars, [literally] a starry night.”
The idea is a brainchild of myself. We will have more than just Christmas music, as the ensembles are very diverse.”
There will be Native American flautists, and several ensembles [consisting] of jazz, rhythm, rock, and blues.”
The group Vol State Showstoppers will be performing ‘Star Carols Medley’, with the finale being ‘A Shining Star’ by Earth, Wind and Fire.”
I hope every student who enjoys and appreciates music will come and enjoy the show”, said Professor James Story, Chair of the Music Arts Department.
Professor Story also added that if any student is interested in joining one of these ensembles for next year’s show, to schedule an appointment to see him in his office in the Steinhauer-Rogan-Black Humanities Building.
He is looking for brass, percussion and woodwind players in particular.
“I attended the Christmas program last year, and it was very entertaining. I hope I can go this year, but work hates me.”
I am looking forward to hearing my favorite Earth, Wind and Fire song ever, other than on commercials during the holidays.”
Mr. Story really knows what he’s doing, and even the shows of his I have seen outside of Vol State are just awesome.”
Christmas time is the best time of the year, for music, food, and human interaction. [Not only do] I hope I can go, but I hope that all students that enjoy this time of year as much as I do will go and enjoy this show.” said Dakota Rogers, a student at Vol State.
CDs of the performance will be five dollars and can be purchased through the music program.
For more information, contact the Office of Humanities at
(615) 230 – 3202.

Spoken word artist NAV comes to Vol State

By: Miguel Detillier
Spoken-word poet Navpreet Sachdev, better known as NAV, spoke at Volunteer State Community College on Nov. 16.
This event took place at the Mary Cole Nichols Dining Room B in the Randy and Lois Wood Campus Center and lasted from 12:45-1:45 p.m. as part of International Education Week.
Before NAV read his poems to start this event, he suggested everybody in the audience to ask questions in between or after his spoken-word pieces.
NAV started this event by reading a poem called “Defined” that talks about him dealing with racial discrimination in his life.
Next, NAV read “The Apology” after he told a story about being rejected by a girl when he tried to ask for her number. This poem is about him struggling to date a girl and him being a terrible flirter toward women.
NAV then talks about negativity as one of his biggest life struggles, and that he tends to struggles to live to the fullest when he has negative thoughts in his mind. NAS also talked about dealing with his negative thoughts by doing the Think Positive Campaign on social media, especially when he shares positive messages on Snapchat and Instagram with #pathtopositivity, which lead to him reading a poem called “Scars” that talks about the agony that has affected him in his life.
Next, NAV read “What I’m About,” and encouraged the students to help him bring rhythm to his poem by clapping their hands and stomping their feet.
NAV also talked about him becoming a poet by explaining that his breakup with his girlfriend put him in a lot of emotional stress which eventually lead to him starting to write his own poems suicidal. NAV also explained that once he started to write poetry, it compelled him to write and perform his own poems in college and to learn more about the techniques of poetry from watching and studying videos of poets on YouTube.
Next, NAV read “The Politics of Facebook” that talked about the problems of being on Facebook. Afterwards NAV read “I am Singh” and “Full-Time” which both talked about his personal faith.
Finally, NAV read “Thank You Come Again” about his father who grew up in India to close this event.
“This has been a wonderful way for students to participate in an international activity right on campus,” said Anne-Marie Ruttenbur, Coordinator of International Education. “Not only did they get to hear great poetry but they also got to learn about someone from a different culture.”
“I think the event did really well,” said Tabitha Sherrell, Coordinator of Student Activities. “NAV did a fantastic job, and I wish I would’ve love to see more people to come see him perform, but it was still a really good event.”
NAV said that Vol State had great energy and was a lot of fun. NAV also said that the students seemed to be engaged in this event and appeared to enjoy the show.

Weddings Around the World Exhibit at Vol State Community College

Kailyn Fournier
As a part of Volunteer State Community College’s celebration of International Education Week, there was a display in the Carpeted Dining Hall over weddings around the world on Nov. 16th.
There were various tables set up describing wedding traditions in various cultures.
According to Tabitha Sherrell, the concept of weddings around the world came from a woman, Seemi Rizvi, who volunteered to come to Vol State and give students free Henna Tattoos.
The event was then based around the fact that Henna is a wedding tradition in India.
Likewise, the event was centered on Rizvi’s table, which brought in a steady inflow of students from 11 p.m. – 2 p.m. Two students, Abby Humbest and Hunter Gooch, visited the booth, and got their tattoos.
Humbest learned about the event a week before after seeing the fliers for International Education Week on the tables of the cafeteria and remembered after seeing Rizvi’s table set up.
When she sat down, Rizvi just started going to work before Humbest could tell her what she wanted, but Rizvi’s design ended up being every close to what she had in mind.
“I liked the fact she was able to pick up on what I wanted,” said Humbest.
Gooch learned about the event from a friend who wanted to get a Henna tattoo done for themselves.
After he saw their tattoo, Gooch decided to get one as well. He didn’t have a good idea on what design he wanted, so when he sat down, “I let her do what she needed to do,” said Gooch.
She said she started doing this after she had a client who had come in for an original design and just based on how she felt came up with a Japanese appearing design.
It turned out that the girl had Japanese heritage. “After that, I just decided to tell people what I am feeling,” said Rizvi.
“She said my tattoo was a strange one to her and that I create beautiful, meaningful stuff and that I would be a bridge between two things,” said Gooch.
For those who are interested in the Henna tattoos, they can find Rizvi’s business page on Facebook if they look up “Seemi’s Henna Body Art.”
The booths that surrounded Rizvi’s table had information on other cultures.
Some traditions that were mentioned included the Guatemalan tradition of the groom’s mother placing a white bell filled with grains to welcome the couple to the reception, and the German tradition of having the couple work together to saw a log in half.
Respectively, the traditions intend to wish prosperity for the future of the couple, and test their ability to work together.
In front of the display were some passports that were free to take as well as some flyers for Tennessee Consortium for International Studies (TnCIS), a study abroad program for Tennessee students.

Humorist Tom Lehrer Tribute Concert a Success

By: Michaela Marcellino
The Music Department of Volunteer State Community College had their concert, “Too Many Songs by Tom Lehrer (as if that was even possible…)” on Monday, Nov. 7.
This event was a tribute to political humorist and musician Tom Lehrer. It included both faculty and staff from several Vol State music appreciation classes.
The music was upbeat, funny and lively, and seemed to keep the audience laughing the entire time.
The concert included 13 Tom Lehrer songs performed live, as well as videos with Tom Lehrer himself singing—New Math and The Elements—to begin and end the event.
The songs performed live included The Masochism Tango, So Long Mom (a song for World War III), She’s My Girl, and Poisoning Pigeons in the Park. Some of the songs were cynical, yet hilarious takes on political themes, and some were just humorous takes on life in general.
“I thought the show was fabulous, everybody did what they were supposed to do…I think the audience] liked it, they seemed to have a really great time.
“You know, I wanted to give them permission to be as ridiculous and rowdy and crazy as possible, because it is that kind of show. The performers were great.
“Half of them were Mark Granlunds students, and I thought they [all] did great. Ben Troxler [who performed in the show] was a student of mine in 1999, when I first was here [at Vol State].
“[My favorite part of the show] was mine! The song I Hold Your Hand in Mine is extremely funny,” said Nancy Slaughter, associate professor of music, who helped coordinate as well as performed in the show.
All the performers seemed to really enjoy themselves. Even Vol State’s President, Dr. Jerry Faulkner, attended.
“[The show] was great fun. It was very entertaining, and the students did a great job. I do not know if I had a singular favorite part, it was all so good. I do not think I could choose one over the other,” said Faulkner.
“The show went really good, I think everyone did really well. I hope [the audience] was entertained. I think everyone did better than they thought they would do,” said Josie Doyka, a Vol State student who performed in the show.
“[My favorite part of the show] was hitting myself with a tambourine!” said Noah Perkins, another student who performed in the show.
Another faculty member who performed in the show as well as helped coordinate it was Mark Granlund, who teaches voice at Vol State.
“I was so pleased with the students, and their abilities to do what they do. I could not be more proud of them.
“The audience was into it, every bit it of it. They enjoyed it, and laughed at times. I hope they learned to laugh at themselves and laugh with other people. [The concert] gives [students] an opportunity to learn and grow [as] a person. They learn to be their own people,” said Granlund.
The concert was a fun time for everyone involved, and gave the audience the rare and welcome chance to just relax and have fun for a little while.

Spoken Word Artist NAV comes to Volunteer State Community College

By Kailyn Fournier
As a part of International Education week, Volunteer State Community College has invited spoken word artist Navpreet Sachdev, otherwise known as NAV, to perform on Wednesday, Nov. 16. His performance will take place in the carpeted dining room from 12:45 – 1:45p.m.
Like most of the artists who perform at Vol State for various events, NAV was invited here after he performed at the Association for the Promotion of Campus Activities (APCA) in March. “NAV’s performances are raw and authentic, driven by his passion to inspire the best of humanity,” according to their website, www.apca.com.
The APCA conference in March was NAV’s debut as a performer; however, he had attended the conference as a student, prior to that. The performances he saw inspired him and were a large influence in, “His decision to follow his dreams of being a poet came from,” according to the website.
“APCA was able to let him perform live,” said Tabitha Sherrell, Coordinator of Student Activities. She was one of the Vol State members to attend the APCA concert in March and was also one of the decision makers in NAV performing at Vol State.
The handful of students that attended the conference with her were SGA members. At the conference, they all had a booklet on the events, which they used to grade the performers on their act.
This score was on a letter scale, with A being the best and f being the worst. After the APCA, the SGA members would watch the best performer’s videos and make a group judgment call on whether or not they want to invite the performer to attend any events at Vol State.
NAV must have been impressive because in his 10-minute time to perform, he managed to get that A rank from Sherrell and some of the SGA members to perform here for International Education week.
According to Sherrell, his poems addressed issues such as discrimination and the need to improve society. This was a contributing factor in his invitation to perform during international education week as well.
“His performance at the conference was awesome,” said Brittany Davis SGA’s CAB chair and attended the APCA conference alongside Sherrell.
She says her favorite poem of his is “Thank You and Come Again” which is about his father’s immigration and the discrimination he experienced at the various businesses he worked at.
“It’s really powerful,” said Davis.
His other poems include “I Apologize,” about not being able to flirt and being attracted to someone on more than just appearances; “Politics of Facebook,” about the superficiality and ignorance displayed on social media despite it’s potential to change the world; and “Scars” about the damage that is done by the negative words of other people, but also about accepting the scars and moving on.
Sherrell has invited faculty members to bring their students to his performance. Those who are interested can find his YouTube channel NAVNAVNAV, or on his SoundCloud, NAV the Poet.

Veterans honored with Recognition Luncheon by Vol State Community

By Miguel Detillier
Volunteer State Community College celebrated Veterans Day by hosting the Veterans Recognition Luncheon at the Randy and Lois Wood Campus Center on Nov. 10.
This event took place in the Mary Cole Nichols Dining Room B and lasted from 12:30 – 2 p.m.
The Veterans Recognition Luncheon started with Belinda Fowler, President of Vol State Veterans of America (VSVA), reciting The Pledge of Allegiance with the audience. Fowler also talked about what a veteran is and what it means to be one and why people choose to be veterans.
Next, Ken Hanson, Veterans Affairs Coordinator, asked the audience if any faculty, staff or students were veterans of the military by having them raise their hands, and asked the audience to raise their hands if any dependents have supported their veterans today.
Hanson talked about the history of Veterans Day by claiming that this holiday started originally as Armistice Day on Nov. 11, 1918 during the end of World War I.
Hanson also said that Armistice Day was declared as an official U.S. holiday a year later for many people to celebrate the veterans who fought in World War I, and even said that Armistice Day was renamed as Veterans Day from a bill passed by Congress in 1954 since the United States started having more veterans after World War II.
“Recently, I had the honor of a gentleman from the Netherlands who came to visit me, and he was telling me he couldn’t believe how much we honor our veterans in the United States,” said Hanson.
Hanson then shared the gentleman’s sentiment by thanking each of the military veterans in the audience and to those that are in the military for their service.
“We are all brothers and sisters in arms and we need to keep it that way,” said Hanson.
“I had someone telling me years ago, ‘you got your brothers and your sisters that you grew up with, but those that you grew up with in the military and that bond that you have what goes that are in the military is even stronger than the blood bond that you have,’” added Hanson.
Hanson said that Vol State is proud to support their veterans and military students who work hard towards their educational goals.
Hanson also said that the Veterans Center and the Office of Veterans Affairs are all there to help military students have a better education.
Finally, Barry Rice, President of the Tennessee State Council Vietnam Veterans of America closed the Veterans Recognition Luncheon by saying that this country is coming together to remember, honor and pay tribute to those who have served for the United States bravely.
“The veterans we honor today came from all walks of life, but they share the qualities of courage, pride, determination, selflessness, dedication and integrity,” said Rice.
Tabitha Sherrell, Coordinator of Student Activities, said that this event was a great way to support the veterans who came to this event.

Sigma Kappa Delta holds Dead Poets open mic

By: Miguel Detillier
Volunteer State Community College hosted Dead Poets Open Mic at the Steinhauer-Rogan-Black Humanities Building on Oct. 31.
This open-mic reading took place at the SRB Performing Arts Studio and lasted from 12:45-2:00 p.m., and was hosted by Sigma Kappa Delta (SKD).
Many students, faculty and staff were offered to participate in this open-mic by reading poems during the event.
The Dead Poets Open Mic started with student Ethan Gorham who read “Ozymandias” by Percy Shelly.
Next, freshman and English major Sarah Cox read through Christina Rossetti’s “Remember.” After that, Pre-Medical Profession major Camille Cole read a poem called “Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou.
I even got to participate in this event by reading Henry Vaughan’s “They Are All Gone into The World of Light.” I decided to read that poem because I loved the words from this poem.
After that poem, student Morgan Seay read through Dylan Thomas’ “Do not go gentle into that good night.” Next, Leslie LaChance, Associate Professor of English, read a couple of poems from John Keats called “This Living Hand” and “When I Have Fears.”
Laura Mcclister, Instructor of English, then read “Lady Lazarus” by Sylvia Plath.
Next, English Instructor Julia Cawthon read an excerpt from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet called “To be or not to be.”
Also, Kelly Sleeper, Vice President of Sigma Kappa Delta, read Robert Browning’s “Porphyria’s Lover,” and Sigma Kappa Delta President Gaynell Payne read Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado.” After those poems, Cox read “Phenomenal Woman” by Maya Angelou.
Next, sophomore John Beutkeucius read “Matilda” by Hilaire Belloc, and Jerushah Blackburn read “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe.
Mickey Hall, Professor of English, then read Billy Collins’ “The Dead,” and McClister read W.H. Hauden’s “Funeral Blues.” Afterwards, Beutkeucius read through “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll.
Also, student Kristin Meeks read a brief quote from Samuel Taylor Coolidge, “Sir, I admit your general rule, that every poet is a fool, But you yourself may serve to show it, That every fool is not a poet.”
Finally, Payne read through a brief excerpt from “Premature Burial” by Edgar Allan Poe to close out the Dead Poets Open Mic.
Overall, I thought the Dead Poets Open Mic was a great event.
I really enjoyed most of the poems in the open-mic reading, especially those LaChance read from John Keats as well as McClister, who read one from Sylvia Plath, which I thought went well and related to the spirit of Halloween.
LaChance said that the Dead Poets Open Mic was a well-attended and fun event. LaChance also said she was very impressed by the variety of poems the students chose to read.
“I was very pleased with the turn out and the participation,” said Mcclister. “Most of the literary works that were read reflected the fall season, which really added to the ambience of the room.”

Music Department holds tribute concert, open for all VSCC students

By Michaela Marcellino
Volunteer State Community Colleges’ Music Department hosted a concert at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 7. It was in the new Steinhauer-Rogan-Black (SRB) Humanities Building, Room 151.
Nancy Slaughter, Associate Professor of Music, said that students have been busy with preparations for this exciting event all semester.
According to the flier, “everyone is invited to witness this tribute to political humorist Tom Lehrer.”
The flier also says that this event counts as the concert for Music 1030 classes.
“This is going to be very humorous and satirical. Tom Lehrer is a guitar player, and a political humorist. [The show is] going to be crazy. We will be able to lighten up the mood before the election.
Some of the songs are just really crazy. My song is called Poisoning Pigeons in the Park, and it basically is just a song about the springtime. It is beautiful, and then turns into this crazy, humorous thing.
We really want people to laugh, and have fun. I’m really excited [for the show]. There is going to be props and it will be very theatrical,” said a Volunteer State student, Rachel Loney, who is performing in the show.
“I hope people think [the show] is fun. [Performing is] fun, and I really love entertaining people. I really enjoy helping people enjoy the show,” said Josie Doyka, another Vol State student performing in the concert.
“I hope [students attending the event] will get to see that music can be ridiculous and silly, as well as serious. [This will be] a fun-filled concert with political satire and other humorous songs. [This event will include] singers and instrumentalists, faculty and students,” said Slaughter.
As this concert is a tribute to Tom Lehrer, students may want to know more about him. The site www.thefamouspeople.com has a bio on Tom Lehrer, which says that he is “…an American singer-songwriter and mathematician. He is known for his dark humor and satire.
As a singer he often parodied popular songs and wrote controversial lyrics dealing with the social and political issues of his times.
He began writing songs and tunes from a young age. Lehrer was a brilliant student; he earned his AB in mathematics from Harvard University at the age of 19 and his master’s degree the next year…and taught at MIT, Harvard and Wellesley.
He was a confident man who spoke his mind and never worried about political correctness. His songs often created controversy due to their dark, macabre and satirical nature, but he never bothered.
He started writing funny songs while in college to amuse himself and his friends though he had no plans to become a musician. But his friends who greatly enjoyed his parodies and comic songs encouraged him to record them.
Thus, he recorded his first album, ‘Songs by Tom Lehrer’ under his own label Lehrer Records in 1953. Lehrer was a comic paradox who successfully managed two seemingly unrelated careers—one as a mathematician, the other as a musician.”
Everyone involved hopes that the event was a fun and hilarious evening for those who attended.