Professor Jaime Sanchez holds lecture on the ancient Maya Civilization

By Kailyn Fournier
On Wednesday, Jaime Sanchez, professor of English and Spanish at Volunteer State Community College, held a lecture in the Thigpen Library’s Rochelle Center on the Maya civilization. The lecture drew in a small crowd, including the president of Vol State, Jerry Faulkner, who, upon recognition stated, “I’m just a student today.”
One of the points addressed in the lecture was intelligence of the society. This included the infamous Mayan calendar, in which Sanchez referred to the winter solstice of 2012, and the people who believed it would turn out to be doomsday.
“I don’t know how they thought that…they just didn’t get to that point,” Sanchez said, which received a laugh from the audience.
In regard to the intelligence of their culture, their calculations about the Sun and Moon were extremely accurate. Although this was not the same with celestial masses further away, such as Venus, their calculations were near exact when it came to the Moon and the Sun with the help of the Mayan understanding of Geometry.
“Their view of our universe is complex, and I would like to understand it better,” said Sanchez, after the lecture.
Sanchez also commented on their knowledge when talking about the Mayan game of pitz, which is a sport that is similar to what would happen if someone mixed basketball and soccer.
The game is played like soccer, however the goal is a small stone circle, much like a donut shape, that is just large enough for the ball to go through, and it is attached high on the wall, or sides of the court.
This is not the part of the game that Sanchez commented on, however, as many aspects of the game are still largely unknown. What he did comment on was the knowledge of acoustics the Mayan people demonstrated through the structure of these game courts.
If a speaker were to stand on a platform, and a person stood on another platform a football field away from the speaker, and they were to talk in a low voice, the person could easily hear the speaker.
“It would be like the person was standing two feet in front of them,” said Sanchez.
Sanchez then addressed the diet of the people in the Maya culture, which was mostly corn, and how it correlated with their beliefs. The Mayas believed that mankind existed in 3 forms: the first people being made of clay, the second people being made of wood, and the third peoples, us, being made of the corn plant, an idea that brings a whole new meaning to “you are what you eat.”
Along with that, Sanchez also addressed one of the reasons the Maya diet contained little meat, which was because the species of turkey the Mayans were exposed to were larger, meaner, and had less meat on the breast of the bird than the turkey most Americans know.
In addition to that, “it was a pretty ugly bird,” said Sanchez.
He also went over the artistic side of the culture, showing the audience pictures of the clothing style and their paintings, but he also showed photos of K’inich Janaab’ Pakal’s tomb, and the jade mask that was found inside.
Sanchez told the audience that the mask was stolen, a feat that may not be surprising to many; however, “it is like if someone stole the Liberty Bell,” said Sanchez.
The mask, he continued, was not found until the bust of someone high up in the drug business and the police searched his mansion, and found the jade mask inside.
One of the audience members there, Patricia Highers, is an English Professor who although she missed the discussion of the Maya calendar and art, said she was glad she got to see him talk about the temples and pitz.
“I just think ancient structures and architecture are really interesting,” said Highers.
“For me it’s always about the person… [and] I thought it was fantastic,” said Michelle Vandiver-Lawrence, Associate Professor of Spanish. “It shows us how they developed and how that effects today’s cultures.”

How to Get Ready for Halloween

Halloween is one of the most exciting times of the year for some people.
The pumpkin patches, haunted houses, bon res, and costume shopping can really get you in a spooky mood.
While this time of the year is very exciting it can also be very dangerous.
With the outbreak of people dressing up as clowns going around scaring and harming people this year people should be especially cautious.
You never know what someone is capable of. The person dressed up as something innocent at the Halloween party may have other intentions.
Never trust someone you do not know with your drink or food. It is so easy to slip drugs or other harmful substances in someone’s food or drink when you leave it unattended.
You can never be too careful. Never ever get in the car alone with someone you do not know. Someone’s true intentions are most likely to come out when you are completely alone with
them.Especially if you have been drinking, ladies or gentlemen, be cautious about alone time with strangers.
Nothing good can come out of alcohol and alone time with strangers. It is always better to travel with groups of friends. Even if you get separated from them
most times someone will notice and come looking for you. Good friends are always going to make you feel safe when you are around them.
They will make sure you are safe from harm, the same way you, hopefully, will look after your friends.
While I have never advised someone dress as a clown for Halloween, I especially do not advise this currently.
People are on the lookout for clowns this year because of all the tension that has been happening lately and they may or may not be ready to harm those in clown costumes.
If you have children another great tip to use when trick-or-treating is putting reflectors on their costumes.
This will help attentive drivers be able to spot them if they happen to get loose from you and get into the road.
As much as parents and guardians hate to think about it children do get out of sight due to excitement and curiosity.
Picking a special reflector to put on your child can help you better spot them in this situation.
The curiosity takes over not just children, but all of us during Halloween. Anyone who has watched a horror movie can tell you that curiously wandering into abandoned houses, wooded areas, or other buildings is a
terrible idea.
Each time someone sticks their
nose where it does not belong in horror movies it ends up being a complete disaster.
They end up unlocking something that does not need to be unlocked, poking at something that does not need to be poked, or becoming possessed with something that really wants to possess someone.
There is no telling what kind of creatures, clowns, or people are dwelling in those areas and it is just better to not nd out.
Lastly, always use your better judgement. If something is telling you that you better not do something, you better not do it.
If, however you do get yourself
into a bad situation this Halloween that you do not know how to get out of it is always a good idea to call someone.
Whether it be a family member or friend they can only provide you with help and support if something bad has happened,
I hope everyone has a safe, and very happy Halloween.

Ben Troxler performs at Vol State

by Michaela Marcellino
Ben Troxler, Bass Vocalist, per- formed in a voice recital at Volunteer State Community College on Oct. 18. This performance took place at the Steinhauer-Rogan-Black Humanities Building and lasted from 2:30-3:30 p.m., and Troxler was accompanied by Matt Phelps on piano.
Troxler graduated from Vol State with an Associate Degree and from Austin Peay State University with a Bachelor of Science in Composition, and currently serves as the Director of Music Ministries and pianist at Glendale United Methodist Church, and is the bass section leader in the Sanctuary Choir of West End United Methodist Church.
This recital started with Troxler singing “Arm, Arm Ye Brave” and “Si, tra i cieppi” that are both writ- ten by George Frederic Handel. After the rst two songs, Troxler then sang Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s “In diesen heil’gen Hallen” from “Die Zauber oete.”
I thought that those songs Troxler sang showed an upbeat mood which
I really like. I loved the way how the chords would change when Phelps would play the piano on “Si, tra i cieppi,” and also how calm and nice Troxler sounded when he sang “In diesen heil’gen Hallen.”
Troxler then performed Johannes Brahm’s “O wiist ich doch den Weg zurück” which had a much darker mood than the first three songs. Also he performed Jean Baptiste Lully’s “Bois épais” written by Jean Bap- tiste Lully and Gabriel Fauré’s “Les Berceaux.”
What I like about those songs is how emotional Troxler and Phelps sounded when they played those songs from Phelps’ piano playing and
Troxler’s singing.
After Troxler performed “Les
Berceaux,” Phelps played Sergei Rachmaninoff’s “Sonata no. 2 in B- at minor, Op 39 in the second movement in non-allegro-lento.
Then Troxler sang a series of songs all composed by Aaron Copland to close the recital, and those songs were “The Boatmen’s Dance,” “Long Time Ago,” “Simple Gifts,” “At the River,” and “Zion’s Walls.”
I really enjoyed how uplifting these songs sounded in the recital, especially in “The Boatmen’s Dance,” which Troxler sounded con dent with his singing.
Annabelle Lee, former adjunct professor, said that Troxler and Phelps performed well in the recital, and that he performed the pieces effortlessly and communicated effectively with his audience.
“I thought that performance was
wonderful,” said Benjamin Graves, Assistant Professor of Music.
“Troxler and Phelps were fantastic in their performance, and I especially enjoyed the Brahms selection as well as the Copland songs, and even Phelps’ performance of ‘Sonata no. 2 in B- at minor, Op 39.
“ I loved how rich and warm Troxler sounded with his voice which made it easy to listen to for the audience, and kudos to Nancy Slaughter for hosting these wonderful musicians,” continued Graves.
“I thought this performance was well-done with Troxler’s spot-on and correct vocal technique and Phelps’ piano playing,” said Nancy Slaughter, Associate Professor of Music. “Troxler told me that it was great to perform at Vol State, and personally it was lovely to see him perform since he was my student in 1999.”

VSCC holds understanding sexual assault seminar

by Lillian Lynch
On Oct. 18 You have the Power… know how to use it, Inc. hosted a seminar on understanding sexual assault.
Veronica Clark, the main speaker, began the presentation with background information on You have the Power. It was formed in 1993 by Andrea Conte, the former First Lady of Tennessee and a victim of sexual assault.
Clark showed a documentary entitled “I Never Thought it was Rape.” The video showed three women, all victims of sexual assault, telling their stories.
The first woman told a story of the aftermath of a college party. Her boyfriend at the time let her ride home with one of her friends after she had been drinking. He took advantage of that and of her. She was left believing it was her own fault.
The second woman to tell her story began with her meeting a man at a club. They were together at his apartment when his advances became
forceful. It was not until she talked to a psychologist at her school that she figured out it was rape. This discovery led her into alcoholism and a string of multiple lovers.
The third woman explained that her family had just moved to TX and she was trying to make friends. At the time, she was 13 and she met an older boy of 17. He became her first boyfriend and showed kindness to her parents. One day, they were locked in her room when he antagonized her into having sex. She had never even had her period.
After the documentary, Clark showed a short clip on the meaning of consent.
Consent must be voluntary. If someone is incapacitated they cannot give consent. The absence of “no” does not mean “yes.” Consent must be a clear and conscious decision.
Next was a guest speaker, Shirley Marie Johnson, a victim of sexual assault and President and CEO of Exodus, Inc. She began by asking the audience their feelings on recent occurrences of public gures’ misogynistic comments.
She then went on with a few statistics.
Only three percent of rapists are convicted and serve their time. In Afghanistan, women are imprisoned for being raped. Women have a two- to-one chance of being raped versus getting breast cancer.
Johnson then told her story.
“In six years of marriage, about 900 times I woke up with my husband on top of me, doing things to me,” said Johnson.
She then explain how her church had told her she needed to go home and please her husband.
Once her time was up, a panel of three people got together in front of the audience to take questions.
The rst question was from the audience.
“Do you think more people are reporting sexual assault?”
“Since I’ve been on campus I have seen more people report it. The word’s getting out that it’s okay to talk about it,” said Angela Lawson, the Assistant Chief of Campus Police.
“Resources for victims and media
awareness are increasing,” said Lori Cutrell, Director of Human Resources. The next question was, “How can someone here report a sexual assault?” “You can report to anyone here on campus. There are upwards of 80 official reporters. Faculty is mandated to report by policy but not by federal
law,” said Lawson.
There are also step-by-step
instructions on how to report an assault and things to do and not to do directly after a sexual assault under Volunteer State Community College’s Policies and Procedures page on www.volstate. edu.
“What’s the difference between sexual assault and rape?” asked Clark.
“Sexual assault is touching and groping while rape is unwanted penetration,” said Lawson.
The next question was, “How many reports of sexual assault have there been on campus in the last three years?”
“There have been about 10 – 15 reports just to Human Resources,” said Cutrell.
The next question was directed at Johnson.
“How long was it before you decided to seek help?”
“I knew something was wrong but I was afraid to leave and be looked down on by the church. He wanted the divorce. I didn’t want to be the one to do that,” said Johnson.
The last question was, “How do the rape victims go on with their lives?” “Some find healing in helping others that have been through the same thing. It depends on the person,” said
Clark.
The seminar was left with a word
of advice.
“It’s never your fault,” said
Johnson.

Graduation deadline is almost here

by Cole Miller
Graduation is necessary to get a degree, and the priority deadline to graduate from Volunteer State Community during the Spring 2017 semester is Oct. 31. The final deadline for this is Feb.1. The process of applying to graduate is one very graduation packet,which can be picked up in the Hal Reed Ramer Administration Building in room 183 in the Office of Records and Registration. According to the Graduation Packet, students applying to graduate after the priority deadline must submit a Graduation Plan by the final deadline date in order to graduate during that semester, otherwise they will be moved to the next semester. This means that if a student misses the Feb. 1 deadline, they would graduate in the Summer 2017 semester, rather than the Spring 2017 semester. The priority and final deadlines for the Summer 2017 semester are March 15 and June 1, respectively. The packet also states that applicants must review all graduation requirements in their College Catalog for their program, check their progress by using
DegreeWorks, and to work closely with their advisor to make sure that all requirements have been or will be met in their anticipated graduated term. Vol State has two graduation ceremonies each year, at the end of the Fall and Spring semesters. All Summer graduates will participate in the following Fall ceremony. Although participation in the commencement is optional, it is strongly encouraged. All requirements for the respective program must be completed before the credential can be posted to the student’s transcript, or a diploma awarded to the student. For students that are graduating this semester, make sure to contact the bookstore by Nov. 11 to order your cap and gown for the ceremony. Graduation rehearsal is Dec. 9, at 10 am in the gymnasium located in the T. Wesley Pickel Field House. The ceremony will be held in the same place,on the following day,Dec. 10, in the gym. The phone number for the bookstore is 615-230-3636, or you can visit them in the Randy and Lois Wood Campus Center. The “Prospective Graduate Checklist”
lists several things that are needed to check off in order to graduate. They are: completion of all course requirements, all exit exam(s) taken, a minimum of 2.000 GPA unless the student is studying for an Associate of Science in Teaching which requires a GPA of 2.75, pay all financial obligations to the college including overdue fees and parking tickets, making sure all deadlines are met, and picking up the diploma on or after the designated dates of the semester graduation occurs for the respective student. Diplomas are available beginning on the following dates for Fall 2016, Spring 2017 and Summer 2017 semesters, respectively, Feb. 15, June 15, and Sept. 15. Graduates that cannot pick up their diploma can have their diploma mailed to them by providing a written release and pre-addressed, prepaid envelope to the Records office. “Make sure you meet with your advisor to discuss which classes you need to have credit for [in order to graduate],” said Amber Reagan, Graduation Analyst. “Everything you need to know, and the required forms are all on the graduation packets.”

The Alex Michael Band performs at Vol State’s annual Fall Festival

by Kailyn Fournier
Those who were at Fall Festival from 1 p.m. – 2 p.m., probably heard the music from the band playing in the Quad. That was the Alex Michael Band, a country music band from Nashville.
Volunteer State Community College got the band to perform at Fall Festival by attending the Association for the Promotion of Campus Activities (APCA) Conference where the band was being bid on by a variety of schools.
The band includes the lead, Alex Michael, along with Thomas Hassell on drums, Jonathan Warren on fiddle, Dean Green on bass, and Sam Van Fossen on lead guitar. They have been a band since 2011 and, aside from Tennessee, have played in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Texas.
At Vol State they opened with a cover of Dierks Bentley’s song, 5-1-5- 0, and over the course of the hour played 15 other songs. They had some technical difficulties, causing their lead microphone to cut out during the end of one of their songs, but the band did not let that faze them and finished the song as if nothing had happened. Once they were finished, they were able to resolve the issue
After that, Michael asked if their audience was okay with them going ahead and playing what Michael called their, “Show offy song,” before playing the tune for “Devil Went Down To Georgia.” For those not familiar with the song, it is particularly notable for its fiddle solos, which likewise show-cased Warren’s ability the most, but had a part for each member to show off.
Those who like line dancing should have been at the concert because towards the end of the show the band asked if anyone knew how to line dance. As a result
of their traveling and playing up North, where it is not common for people to line dance, they took “Copperhead Red” out of their set list. A few people knew how to, so the band played the song, and the few audience members who knew how to line dance taught those who were interested. “It’s always fun when the crowd gets into it,” said Michael.
Also in their song selections were two of the band’s original songs, “That Woman” and “Carousel.” Both songs are new and have yet to be recorded. They also took requests, which were “Dixieland Delight” by Alabama and their closing song, “Chicken Fried” by the Zac Brown Band.
“I was really impressed by the lead singer,” said Natalie White, Vice President of the Student Government Association, after the performance was over.
Those interested in The Alex Michael Band should check out their Facebook and their twitter page at @AlexMichaelBand. “For those who are interested in our stuff can go to our Bandcamp page and enter the promo code: “volstate” for 10 percent off on our music and merchandise,” said Warren. They also have their album on their Facebook page under the tab “Buy our music here.”
The band wanted to thank Ben Graves and Tabitha Sherrell for making it possible for them to be here.

Assistant professor of history hosts WWII display

By: Michaela Marcellino
Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 24 and 25, Vol State students had an opportunity to see a large display of items from World War Two. Peter Johnson, assistant professor of History, brought in his personal collection, and set them up in the Rochelle Center in Thigpen Library. There were four tables worth of items, as well as music from the 1940’s being played, and a slideshow of WWII photos.
His collection covers a wide range of items, and includes everything from uniforms, to weaponry, to ration boxes, to instruments, to patches, to flags, to newspapers and more. There were also multiple photographs, and even a yellow star that would have marked a Jewish person in that time.
“These are all World War II items that I have collected for a number of years, since I was probably ten. I bring [the collection] into my American history classes every semester to show, and to give some visual background. [The students] can actually see what we are learning in history. These are all artifacts from the war, and the items are about 70 to 75 years’ old. It gives you a first-hand view of what actually took place in the war, instead of just telling everybody. I have American, German, and Japanese items,” said Johnson.
As the Rochelle Center was filled with these artifacts, Students were able to peruse the tables and take it all in. “[The display] is amazing. We are probably the last generation to be able to know someone who actually fought in World War Two, so it becomes really personal. I think it is better to see [World War Two] like this, first-hand, as opposed to seeing it in a textbook. You feel much more connected to it. We are very fortunate to have someone is as passionate about history as Professor Johnson is,” said Kelly Sleeper, a Vol State student.
“I would hope students would be able to connect what they are seeing [here at the display] with what they are learning in class. I think that the more you connect visual aids, with auditory and all those other kinds [of aids], it helps you realize what is going on around you. The one part of history that I love, is that in order not to repeat it, you must learn from it.
Without these men and women who fought during World War Two, we would not be where we are now. We would not have the society or the freedoms that we so enjoy. They really paved the way,” said Jennifer Wooden, who does supplementary instruction for Professor Johnsons’ class.
“World War Two was a pivotal point in American History. Number one, it brought us out of the greatest economic depression that we have ever faced as a nation. When the bombs dropped at Pearl Harbor, unemployment virtually disappeared in six months. These men and women who volunteered and were drafted, answered the nations’ call. When they got victory, they literally came home and changed the face of America. Tom Brokaw, who was an NBC reporter, gave them the title ‘the Greatest Generation,’ and I wholeheartedly agree…[by seeing this display] I hope the students will gain a new appreciation of what it took for our nation to fight this war, and to succeed,” said Johnson.

Joel Myers performs at Vol State

By: Lillian Lynch
At the age of 29, Meyers has been practicing magic for 23 years.
“I got started in magic because my dad showed me my first magic trick when I was six. I used to travel with him, he was a traveling salesman, and we’d go from city to city and always end up in the most touristy cities. So I would go stand out in the street in a really busy area like Santa Monica Boulevard in California, Times Square in New York City or Key West Florida right on the boardwalk. I’d say ‘Hey everybody there’s going to be a magic show.’ I was about eight or nine and my dad would leave me there and I would perform on the streets. I’d make $500 or $600 a day,” said Meyers.
The show he performed for Vol State was one of many, including his multiple appearances on television. Meyers began the show with a short introduction and an old trick of making a bottle disappear in a paper bag.
As his title of “interactive illusionist” suggests, he asked for an audience member to come up on stage.
Hannah Brindel, a student at Vol State, was first on stage. Meyers did a few card tricks with her before having Brindel hold up a lemon. She stood at the edge of the stage and held up the fruit. Meyers, across from her, was holding a knife as if he were going to throw it and hit the lemon.
Meyers joked and took the lemon. He cut it open to reveal Brindel’s previously torn up card in tact within.
“I was terrified he was going to throw that knife,” said Brindel.
Meyers then began talking about one of the most famous magicians of all time, Harry Houdini.
“Houdini could actually swallow and regurgitate things. He would often swallow a key and regurgitate it. That was how he got out of a lot of traps,” said Meyers.
With the set up of regurgitation, Meyers swallowed a very sharp and very real sewing needle. He then took a small thread and put on end of it in his mouth, swallowing part of it. As he pulled on the string the needle followed. The thread was now tied around the needle’s eye.
Continuing with Harry Houdini’s famous tricks, Meyers then pulled out a straight jacket. It was the same kind Houdini had.
“Houdini’s record was three minutes and seven seconds. Today I’m going to escape this jacket in under two minutes,” said Meyers.
He had two audience members help strap him into the jacket.
Meyers struggled as the audience cheered. He dislocated his shoulder in order to twist out of the bounds and escaped the jacket with 10 seconds to spare.
Meyers’ last trick was accompanied by a story from his childhood.
He had never seen snow, as his family would travel to his grandfather’s house in California during the holiday season. The one year he asked if they could stay so he could see the snow, there was no snow.
The next day his father woke him up and told him to look outside. Meyers saw snow for the first time.
For weeks afterward he would go around his house tearing up small pieces of paper trying to recreate the feeling he had when he first saw snow.
His father then showed him the very last trick he performed.
“Nothing is impossible,” said Meyers.
He took a Chinese fan, a single piece of tissue paper and made it “snow” in the dining room.
“I love magic. I love going to magic shows. This show was no disappointment,” said Zachary Bolt, a student at Vol State.

Vol State goes green by adding solar pannels and vehicle chargers

By: Miguel Detillier
Solar panels and electric vehicle charging stations are helping to protect the environment at Volunteer State Community College.
Vol State are providing solar panels to the Randy and Lois Wood Campus Center along with the electric vehicle charging station across from John B. Wallace Health Sciences Building North near the Thigpen Library as part of a project sponsored by the Campus Sustainability Committee to help utilize campus sustainability fees and to take the resource efficiency steps needed to make the Steinhauer-Rogan-Black Humanities Building LEED Certified, according to the college blog, the Insider.
This blog also explains that the solar panels have been mounted on top of the physical plant cooling stations, and that Plant Operations will be placing a marker to show the solar panel stats to students and visitors, and that there are two power cords available for recharging electric cars and can be free to use for anyone.
The energy from the panels goes directly into the Wood Campus Center power grid and the panels cost about $6,686, according to the Insider. This blog also said that the four panels can produce 1,124 kilowatt hours a year, and is projected to save about 1.4 barrels of oil each year.
“The charging stations are up and running are open for anyone to use,” said William Newman, Senior Director of Plant Operations. “The solar panels will be wired in and operational by this week.”
“I’m excited to have the solar panels and the electric car charging stations on campus because it encourages us to think more sustainability,” said Le-Ellen Dayhuff, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. “And because I think it offsets some of the energy costs around Vol State.”
The Insider explains that the Sustainability Committee has been actively using the fee money for campus improvements, and the funds have been used to install energy-effcient LED lighting in the J.T. Fox Maintenance Building and on the Highland Crest campus. This blog also said that that the committee welcomes suggestions to help protect the environment on campus.
Besides providing solar panels and electric vehicle charging stations, Vol State also provides hydration stations to encourage people to reuse drinking containers since plastic water bottles are one of the biggest challenges to waste disposal, according to the Insider. This blog also confirms that Vol State also offers recycling bins to help students recycle plastic drinking containers and is paid for by the Committee, and that the committee members are suggesting everybody to recycle to provide a sustainable environment at Vol State.
The Insider explains that future possibilities for the Committee to help protect the environment around campus include solar umbrellas that would provide cell phone and laptop charging stations for students working outside at picnic tables.
This blog also said that students can contact Keith Bell, Associate Professor of Geography, at
keith.bell@volstate.edu for suggestions to the Committee to help protect the environment at Vol State.

SGA food survey may bring changes to campus

by Kailyn Fournier
The Student Government Association (SGA) at Volunteer State Community College conducted a food survey from September 29 to October 5 in order to gather opinions from the student body regarding the food services available on campus. The purpose of the survey was to give SGA an idea of what areas needed improving on when it came to food. They were concerned with the pricing of food and the quality of food that was being offered.
“This is my second year at Vol state. So I had a year of actually being a student and listening to other students, and purchasing the food, and eating it and trying it and living here as a student. I personally didn’t like what the foods services was offering. I know I’ve heard from many students and faculty and staff it’s just not up to par with what we should have here. So I brought it up to the SGA, and they all agreed it was a problem,” Said Dillon van Rennes, who is the secretary of treasury for SGA.
There is also the issue of food insecurity on campus. For the students who don’t have the means to purchase food every day, there were a few questions that on the survey as well.
“When we see some need like this we’re going to investigate, “said Van Rennes.
For those students. The SGA hopes to use the data from the survey to go towards a food bank that they are trying to put in place. They have already gotten it approved, along with the grant to fund it. “Hopefully [this survey] will get the ball rolling,” said Van Rennes
The survey also reached out to the other campuses.
Those campuses have one building and no lunch room. They did have a food truck, but no one was utilizing it. “[Fixing] that should be one of our goals on campus,” said Brittany Davis, the SGA cabinet chair for the campus activities board.
The survey is meant to address everyone’s concerns. For those who can afford the food on a daily basis, that means improving the quality of food and the selections that are available. For those who can’t afford the food on a daily basis, that’s what the potential food bank will be for.
“I think it’s a great way for students to get their information out there,” said Crystal Sloss, who is the National Society of Leadership and Success’s representative for SGA.
There were also questions about a meal plan on the survey. If that were to be put in place later on, it could be federally funded.
The survey was a way for them to know specifically what to focus on and where there is a bigger need from a very neutral standpoint.
“We don’t have people coming in and constantly telling us what we’re doing right or wrong. That’s why I like the survey. It tells us exactly what we need to be doing,” said Natalie White, the vice president of SGA.
“We are a very passionate team. We want to make a positive change and we strive to work with administration and communicate with administration to get all of these things done. Were here to serve the student body,” said Van Rennes.
The exact date SGA will get the results back is unknown. “We are working directly with Jane McGuire, vice president of institutional effectiveness. She has not given us a solid date but we are hoping to have the results back by November 1,” said Van Rennes.
“I hope the results allow us to get a change,” said Sloss.