Hunger Games to benefit The Feed

 

By Riley Holcraft

The Feed, Volunteer State Community College’s food pantry, has announced a food drive from Jan. 29 – Feb. 8 that includes a friendly competition between two teams.

The Hunger Games is a battle between two districts, Red and Blue. At orientation, students and faculty were divided into the teams to compete to end the Hunger Games. Students and faculty are encouraged to bring non-perishable foods such as peanut butter, condiments, macaroni, or canned soup to help their team.

At the Vol State basketball game, Saturday, Feb. 10, the winner will be revealed. Dr. Jerry Faulkner, president of Vol State, will appear at halftime wearing a red or blue shirt to represent the winning team.

Students are encouraged to compete with their friends and to wear their team’s color at the game.

Twenty-five percent of community college students have food insecurities, according to the National Student Campaign against Hunger and Homelessness. Vol State is working to eliminate this problem on their campus.

Lori Miller, administrative assistant in the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, has been an instrumental part in establishing the food drive.

“We are only one semester in, but we’ve seen over 4,000 units distributed out of the Feed and over 200 students have visited,” said Miller.

“It makes a big difference for the students that visit. Not having to worry about a meal allows them to focus better and do what they need to do as students,” said new volunteer Jennifer McMillion, an English professor at Vol State.

The Feed is located in Ramer 151. If students or faculty are interested in participating in any way at The Feed, they can contact Lori Miller at lori.miller@volstate.edu.

Vol State hosts first art exhibit of 2018

 

By Katie Doll

Volunteer State Community College is hosting an art exhibit of graphic designer Lisa Lorek Quine until Feb. 19, in the SRB Humanities Building.

IMG_4483

Courtesy of Lisa Lorek Quine

The display includes lettering design featuring quotes and song lyrics designed to create a nostalgic aesthetic. The quotes come from a variety of sources such as Mark Twain and the musicians Geto Boys.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Quine will visit Vol State Feb. 19, from 11:30-12:30 to answer questions about her artwork.

Based in Cleveland, Ohio, Quine graduated from the University of Dayton with a BFA in Visual Communication Design.

Although she originally started her career in advertising, Quine turned a new leaf and began to focus on her passion in lettering, according to Quine’s description of her exhibit.

“Lettering has opened the door to a variety of visual styles and unique projects,” said Quine.

IMG_4484

Courtesy of Lisa Lorek Quine

Art nouveau, an international style of art taking influence from the natural world, is one of Quine’s inspirations for her style to create detailed illustrations.

A notebook is set out in the gallery for students and faculty to express their opinions of the artist’s display of hand-lettering and illustrations. One visitor acknowledged the use of the color and its impact on the quotes.

IMG_4485

Courtesy of Lisa Lorek Quine

“Love the use of gold,” wrote the visitor, who signed with the initials “HH”. “Very subtle, but brings a bit of youth and vibrancy to something that people believe to be lived out or not relevant.”

Quine was a student of Nathaniel Smyth, assistant professor of art at Vol State, about a decade ago. Smyth helped in bringing in Quine’s artwork to give students an opportunity to see art that they can possibly feel more of a connection too.

“We have a whole lot of students here that are interested in graphic design,” said Smyth. “I think this is good for them to be able to see like ‘Oh hey, look the design and the art, they can kind of mix.”

SGA hosts open house

By Tayla Courage

Volunteer State Community College’s Student Government Association hosted an open house Wednesday, Jan. 24, outside the Wood Campus Center Club Room 213.

“SGA really wants to get their name out there on campus so that students know what SGA stands for and hopefully they want to get involved,” wrote Tabitha Sherrell, coordinator of student activities.

SGA President Caitlyn Ellis acknowledged the tendency for students to shy away from joining organizations that are heavily-involved on campus.

We have learned that a lot of students say they are intimidated by the meetings because they are so formal. We wanted the open house to be very informal, but still informative about what SGA has to offer,” wrote Ellis.

Matt Gillette, SGA attorney general, and Hayley Brazel, SGA secretary, gave out free popcorn and soda while taking questions from prospective members passing by.

“SGA is an organization that helps with student involvement, and it looks really good on a college application,” said Brazel.

She admitted that this was her initial reason for joining SGA but explained that over time she found a passion for getting others involved on campus.

Ellis, like Brazel, believes that being involved in college can set students apart and present greater opportunities when applying to future schools and jobs.

“It has been a huge factor in my college success because I always have someone to turn to to ask questions or a shoulder to lean on when I’m having a bad day. SGA fosters amazing relationships. If I were thinking of joining, my deciding factors would be the friendships I could build and the experiences I would have to put on my resume,” wrote Ellis.

The next SGA meeting is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 5, at 12:45 p.m. in the Rochelle Center of Thigpen Library.

Deadline to apply for graduation approaches

 

By Lauren Whitaker

The graduation application deadline for students completing their degrees at Volunteer State Community College this semester is Feb. 1, by 4:30 p.m.

Students must follow certain steps in order to apply for graduation.

Students must call their assigned advisor to schedule an appointment to apply for graduation.

A graduation packet can be found on the Vol State website or emailed to the student by their advisor, said Becky Adair, a completion advisor at Vol State.

Students who intend on graduating must meet with an advisor.

“An advisor’s signature is required on graduation applications,” Adair said.

Together, the advisor and student fill out Section A of the graduation plan, according to the Vol State website.

There is a Section B to the application the student’s advisor will fill out.

Advisors help coach students on which courses need to be completed before graduation.

“Overall, it was easy to apply for graduation. I simply met with an advisor and filled out the needed information,” said Gareth Laffely, a Vol State student graduating this semester.

Laffely found Vol State to be helpful in applying for graduation, and he was assigned an advisor he could easily schedule a time with.

“Vol State is very good about sending updates,” Laffely said.

A prospective graduation checklist is located on the Vol State website for to help potential graduates to begin the graduation process.

Before a graduation application is filled out, it is important to make sure a student’s required courses will be fulfilled in the current semester. Advisors can help potential graduates confirm the graduation checklist.

In order to graduate, students must apply for graduation by the graduation deadline. Applications received after the final deadline will be filed for the following term, according to the Vol State website.

Study shows economic impact Vol State has on graduates

 

By Ashley Perham

Graduates from Volunteer State Community College’s class of 2016 could potentially earn $470,000 more than workers with only a high school diploma, according to a recent study.

As a whole, the 991 students from the 2016 graduating class have an earning potential of $465.8 million more than workers with only a high school diploma in their working lifetime, according to the study.

This study, “An Analysis of the College’s Economic and Social Impact,” was conducted for Vol State by Knoxville educational consultant Fred H. Martin, according to Vol State’s website.

The study also discussed the social impacts getting a degree from Vol State could have on graduates’ lives, including a greater likelihood of attending a four-year college, improved health habits, increased civic involvement, reduced poverty rates, and increased home ownership levels.

While similar studies have been done about Vol State, this study was the first to look into how a college education could impact a specific graduating class, said Eric Melcher, coordinator of public relations and marketing at Vol State. Continue reading

Snow and ice can delay or close campuses

 

Campus-snow 1-06 097 corrected

Photo by Vol State PR

By Presley Green

Snow and ice can delay classes or close campuses of Volunteer State Community College.

A delay means that classes meeting before the time given in the delay will not be held, according to the Vol State student handbook. Labs may still be held during a delay. The instructor will notify the class through the eLearn system.

If a campus is closed, no labs or classes will meet. The closing of public high schools does not affect the closing of Vol State, according to the handbook.

Closures and delays will vary from campus to campus. Alerts will be posted on Vol State’s website and social media. Students can also be alerted through email or Vol State Text Alerts. Continue reading

CAB to host “Wanna Make S’more Friends?”

 

By Tayla Courage

Volunteer State Community College’s Campus Activities Board will be hosting a social café event in the Mary Nichols Dining Room A Jan. 23 at 12:45 p.m.

The event titled “Wanna Make S’more Friends?” will be open to any students interested in becoming more involved in student life on campus.

“The idea is to spark a conversation about this event and if they would like to see more events of its kind,” according to an email from Crystal Sloss, chairperson of the Campus Activities Board. Continue reading

Vol State announces nursing degree program

 

By Lauren Whitaker

Volunteer State Community College has announced that they will offer an associate degree program in nursing beginning in the fall 2019 semester.

Vol State has considered an associate degree program in nursing for eight years, according to Elvis Brandon, dean of health sciences at Vol State.

“We have actually had the proposal ready twice, but because of the cost of the program, we decided not to move forward with it the first two times,” Brandon said.

The degree is designed to stand alone. Depending on schools with a bridge program from the associate in nursing to the bachelor’s in nursing, there will be the option for students pursuing this degree to transfer, according to Brandon.

The program will have a limit on the amount of students admitted into it.

“Students will have to complete all the prerequisite classes, and obviously, it will be competitive based on grade point average,” said Brandon.

“It’s about time that Vol State got a nursing program,” said Anna Lawson, Vol State student.

“I had hoped they would start one in time for me to go to it, but I’m so excited for future students to have this opportunity. Vol State is a great school, and I’m so glad that they are giving their students more opportunities in education,” Lawson said.

Despite a bachelor’s degree in nursing being recommended, students graduating with an associate degree in nursing can work as a registered nurse, a travel nurse, a school nurse, a psychiatric nurse, and a neonatal intensive care nurse, according to nursing.org.

Students can expect to spend 18-24 months in school before graduating with an associate degree in nursing; and after earning this degree, students are required to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses before becoming a registered nurse, according to Rasmussen.edu.

Academic resources available to students

 

By Ashley Perham

  1.  Thigpen Library - Thigpen Library itself is an academic resource. On the second floor of the building, students will find thousands of physical books which can be sent to any Volunteer State Community College campus.
  2. Study rooms - Students looking for a space to study or work as group have study rooms available. Scattered throughout the library are individual study spaces, including a room designated as “silent.”
  3. IT Department - The college’s information technology department has an open computer lab on the first floor of the library with PCs, Macs, scanners, and printers.
  4. Textbook library - A limited number of textbooks are available for use in the library. Each campus library has textbooks, but there are not textbooks for every class. The services page on the library’s website links to information on textbooks and other resources available for students including technology lending.
  5. Library website - The digital gateway to the library is their website (volstate.edu/library). Here students will find a link to the databases and research guides. The research guides, curated by librarians, link students to the credible resources needed for their assignment.
  6. Library databases - The library provides access to approximately 100 databases, which are available 24/7. Students can use these databases to complete assignments or gain a better understanding of a topic discussed in class. Databases consist of ebooks, streaming videos, and articles from journals, magazines, and newspapers.
  7. Online resources - Students can use the library’s “New York Times Online” subscription to set up a free account and stay up to date with world events through their computer or a phone app. Lynda.com and LearningExpress Library can help students with the skills they need to be a successful student at Vol State.
  8. Research help - Help with research is available in many formats in addition to the library research guides. Review a video tutorial, chat online 24/7, or stop by a library on your campus for help.
  9. NoodleTools – NoodleTools is a website that helps students write papers by organizing their notes and correctly citing their sources. Access to NoodleTools is provided for Vol State students through the library website.
  10. Learning Commons - The Learning Commons in the first floor of the library. The Commons offers tutoring in math, science, reading, and writing. Math tutoring is available from the Learning Support level up to calculus. Chemistry and physics tutoring is also available. Students can also get help with reading and writing through practice essays and reading lessons and tests.
  11. Language Center - The Language Center at Vol State in SRB 205 is available to give students help with different aspects of writing essays such as thesis development, grammar, and style. French and Spanish tutors and resources are also available upon request.

LIBRARY HOURS – 615-230-3400

Monday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Thursday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Friday – 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday – 8:00 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LEARNING COMMONS HOURS – 615-230-3676

Monday – 7:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Tuesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Thursday – 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Friday – 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Saturday – 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LANGUAGE CENTER HOURS – 615-230 – 3397

Monday – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tuesday – 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Wednesday – 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Thursday – 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Friday – 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.