Vol State to host job fair

By Lauren Whitaker

Volunteer State Community College hosts their spring 2018 job career fair Wednesday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Pickel Field House gymnasium.

Around one hundred employers from all over Middle Tennessee, including Gallatin and Hendersonville, will gather in the Pickel Field House eager to connect with students interested in full-time or part-time work.

“Students can walk through this fair, and they can use it for an opportunity to network with employers,” said Talia Koronkiewicz, assistant vice president of student services. “It’s a really great opportunity if students just wanted to network and have a better understanding of what are some jobs that are out there in the career they are working for.”

The career fair is designed to be a learning process for students as well as a doorway of opportunity.

“It’s a great opportunity to practice talking to somebody in more of a formal, professional format and really be able to market themselves. Students will also have the opportunity to apply for different jobs,” Koronkiewicz said.

Full-time jobs will not be the only jobs employers are vetting for. Students who are searching for part-time work will also find opportunities available.

“A lot of the positions don’t even require a degree,” Koronkiewicz said.

The Career Fair will be adding a new flair to its event this year. A professional photographer will be present to take free professional headshots for students interested.

“Students can come into career fair, and there will be a table, right next a LinkedIn table, to get a headshot. We are marketing ‘Get a headshot and create a LinkedIn account’,” said Koronkiewicz. “We are really excited about that, to be able to let students get a free digital picture of themselves. Students should dress as if they are going into an interview and bring their resumes. Walking through the career fair, can be an interview.”

Professor runs for office

 

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via lenassante.org

By Lauren Whitaker

Leonard Assante, Volunteer State Community College professor, is running for sixth district county commissioner in Sumner County as a democratic candidate.

Assante has been an educator in Sumner County for 20 years. As an educator, he has become familiar with the inner needs of education.

This fact was one of the main reasons Assante felt compelled to run for county commissioner.

“I have thought about it before, but I thought the time was right, right now, because I really thought I had something to offer. I finally thought I had enough experience and knowledge that I think I can make some good decisions and a positive contribution,” Assante said.

County commissioners are elected officials who help govern the county by making decisions on subjects like zoning, solid waste collection, budgets, education, and mass transit. Commissioners meet twice a month to address issues and amend them to the best of their knowledge to encourage the county to prosper.

Assante is running unopposed in the democratic primary for one of the two positions up for reelection for the sixth district county commissioner. He will have two opponents that are running in the republican primary.

Assante’s mantra is to help Sumner County thrive while maintaining a small-town feel.

“When most people talk about the local politics, everything always seems to come back to, ‘What is their vision for Sumner County?’” Assante said. “Most people who live here kind of want it to stay the way it is. A unique nature of our county is that it’s close to Nashville, but it’s still got that small-town aspect to it. I want to help keep Sumner County from turning into another suburban sprawl.”

Assante is competent in the mandatory procedures that need to be taken for proper school safety. If elected to the county commission, he hopes to contribute this knowledge to increase the safety of students across Sumner County.

“I’m opposed to these thoughts about arming teachers and whatnot. I think that makes things more dangerous, not safer. We need a school resource officer in every single school. We do not have that right now,” said Assante.

For more information pertaining to Assante and his run for county commissioner, students can visit lenassante.org.

 

Vol State to host Story Slam

 

By Story slam poster 2018Katie Doll

Volunteer State Community College will be hosting its first Story Slam March 20, from 11:10 a.m. – 12:10 p.m., in the Nichols Dining Room in the Wood Campus Center.

The event will be hosted by Jon Goode, according to the Vol State website.

Story Slam is a competition in which performers can tell two to four minute stories about topics that can range from hilarious to heartbreaking. There will be scheduled performers and an opportunity to perform at an open mic. First and second prize winners will win cash prizes, and snacks will be served.

All students, faculty and staff are invited to participate.

Sheri Waltz and Shellie Michael, professors in the communication department, worked together to make the Story Slam project a reality. They wrote a proposal for a Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) grant, and the project was selected for funding. Michael stated the project gave students an opportunity in two speech classes to learn storytelling and increase student engagement.

“In addition to developing a storytelling curriculum in SPCH 1010 and SPCH 103, the project aims to build a culture of storytelling through the Story Slam event,” said Michael.

After this event, the next Story Slams are planned to be held annually every fall semester, as the Hal Ramer Oratorical Contest for public speakers is held each spring.

The event will be recorded and posted on eLearn for students who could not make the event. Online students can also participate, as videotaped stories will be shown.

Michael hopes for students to be entertained and connect over universal experiences.

“Through stories, students can share similarities while celebrating diversity,” said Michael.

Students participating should focus on one specific event with a lesson that was learned from their experience.

Vol State sophomore has musical career outside school

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By Lauren Whitaker

Dillon Kruppa, a sophomore at Volunteer State Community College, is a multifaceted person whose identity exceeds the realms of a normal college student.

Kruppa’s long, blonde hair cascaded past his shoulders in waves as he spoke about his life outside Vol State.

“I write music. I work a photo booth gig. I drink coffee. I read books sometimes, and I talk to chicks,” Kruppa said.

Kruppa’s vibrant clothing, down to his four-leaf-clover belt buckle, and silent confidence emphasizes the creative character he is.

“I have been playing music since 2007. I have done a number of gigs at night around here. I have performed at Café Coco, Family Wash, I have played some stuff out in Chattanooga and plenty of stuff at Vol State like the Christmas concerts and the spring concerts,” Kruppa said.

Kruppa’s talents go beyond simply strumming a guitar or mastering the keys on a piano. His musical skills are dexterous.

“Mainly, I play guitar, piano and voice. Beyond that, I play alto, tenor, bari sax, clarinet, trumpet, French horn, ukulele and whatever I can get my hands on,” said Kruppa.

Kruppa is drawn indie folk music. He is a solo artist, and he markets his music by means of social media.

“My stuff is on Instagram under Dillon Kruppa. There is a video out on YouTube of a live session done out on top of a parking garage in downtown Nashville,” said Kruppa. “There’s a beautiful cotton candy sky backdrop in the video.”

Kruppa spent a period of his life driving a pedicab in downtown Nashville. His stories driving pedicab are adventurous.

“I was chased by a homeless man, presumably on drugs, because a drunk passenger kept yelling obscenities at him. He bolted after us down dark streets, and I ended up kicking the intoxicated passenger out of the cab,” Kruppa said.

Kruppa drove pedicab from July to September. During this time, his biggest event was taking passengers from Justin Timberlake’s Pilgrimage Festival in Franklin.

“I made a bunch of money. Somebody even paid me in very important person tickets,” said Kruppa. “By the last day, I was like forget pedaling. I’m just going to enjoy the festival.”

Kruppa commutes to Vol State from south Nashville. His major is entertainment media production with a concentration in music business.

“In my major, we divide up into teams and try to balance out the concentration the best we can. Then, we select an artist. It could be anything from a painter to a musician. It’s usually a musician, so right now we are recording an extended play for the website,” said Kruppa. “We are recording a music video, developing a business plan, coordinating the social media stuff and pretty much the whole package.”

After all of this project is completed, the students involved, including Kruppa, will venture out into Nashville and present their project to record labels.

After Kruppa finishes at Vol State, he plans to optimally be recognized by the projects Vol State has allowed him to do and use them to get a job.

In the meantime, Kruppa plans to pursue his endeavors in music.

 

Vol State theater department to perform “California Suites”

 

By Riley Holcraft

The theater department at Volunteer State Community College will be performing “California Suites” by Neil Simon, March 16-17, at 7:30 p. m.; March 18, at 2:30 p. m.; and March 23-24, at 7:30 p. m., in Caudill Hall.

“California Suites” is a full-length play divided into four one-act segments. The production follows the separate stories of families from New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, and London. All of the action takes place in the same room, but characters change for each act. This comedy dives into a quick preview of the characters’ lives during their short time in California.  

The play is set in the 1970s, and Noah Geerholt, cast member, stated that the time period is one of his favorite aspects of the production.

“This is a period I don’t see a lot of onstage. Typically, I see settings in modern times, or in the much farther past,” said Geerholt.

Edmon Thomas, director, commented that he is most excited about the play because it has been in the back of his mind for years, and the time has finally come to perform it.

“If you haven’t seen a good live play, you have to see one,” stated Thomas, “It inspires you and allows you to escape for hours as you see it come alive right before you.”

All students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to experience this live performance.

Most of the cast are performing arts majors or theatre veterans.

Cooper Atkins, who plays Marvin Michaels and Stu Franklyn, is well versed in the world of theatre.

“This is my second college production. I’ve done a lot of high school shows and a handful of professional and local shows, but this is the first time I’ve done a straight comedy, and it’s nice to be able to put myself in a new position as an actor,” stated Atkins.

He went on to explain that the cast is full of interesting and talented individuals. The chemistry of the pairings makes for a good laugh, and this production is something everyone can enjoy.

Transfer Fair held at Vol State

 

By Tayla Courage

Volunteer State Community College students had the opportunity to meet with college representatives at the Office of Admissions’ Transfer Fair, Feb. 28.

Representatives from 24 colleges and universities, both in-state and out-of-state, registered to attend the fair, according to Jennifer Johnson, coordinator of student recruitment.

Johnson, although only being employed at Vol State for a short period of time, admitted that last year’s fair wasn’t as successful as it could have been.

“My experience last year, we had it in the Great Hall, and because there’s no classes over here anymore, we did not have a good turnout,” said Johnson.

She said she hoped having the event tables set up in the Wood Campus Center would allow for more student engagement.

The relocation idea worked for Robert Kallush, a sophomore at Vol State, who was eating lunch when he decided to check out the Tennessee Technological University table.

“It’s engineer focused, and being an older student coming back to school, I just want to focus on the degree I’m going for, for electrical engineering, and I was lucky to meet someone instead of just tour the campus like a stalker,” said Kallush.

Connie Pimentel, assistant director of admissions, said that she believes the Transfer Fair was a time for students to ask questions and consider the steps they may want to take after leaving Vol State.

“I think it’s great that we have the opportunity to bring those people here to give our students a chance to kind of just get a feel for what their options are,” said Pimentel.

Allison Hotard, a freshman, who learned about the fair via email, said she used her free time on Wednesday to check out the two schools she is interested in: Tennessee Tech and Middle Tennessee State University.

Alexa Flatt, a sophomore considering the University of Tennessee, said she was unaware of the transfer fair until she walked by and saw it in action.

Flatt said she needed to start thinking about her potential transfer options.

Lindsay Guenther, advisor and counselor, expressed the need for students to continue to play an active role in their individual transfer processes.

 “Make good grades! Even if you have already been admitted to a university, they will still ask for your final transcript,” Guenther wrote in an email.

Guenther also urged transferring students to get an early start on their applications, especially those that concern financial aid.

“Start applying for universities and scholarships now. Scholarship deadlines for fall tend to be sooner than admissions deadlines for fall,” wrote Guenther.

Additional transfer information can also be found in the collection of college brochures in the Ramer Administrative Building’s Advising Center, Room 174.

Club Spotlight: Vol State’s Student Veterans of America

 

By Presley Green

Vol State Student Veterans of America is a club to promote the connectivity and networking among the veterans at Volunteer State Community College.

The club is designed for veterans and their dependents, but anyone is welcomed, student or faculty, veteran or not. However, veteran status is required to be on the board. The VSVA is a charter member of the National Student Veterans of America.

“The Vol State Veterans of America is a good program for veterans to be involved in because it gives them a network of people in the same situations. Most veterans now are coming from wartime situations. The VSVA lets them know others can relate to their struggles in classes or their transition from active duty to civilian life,” said Scott Hilgadiack, VSVA advisor.

The VSVA meets every Wednesday in Room 150 of the Ramer Administration Building. They also volunteer frequently with Veterans of Foreign Wars at the food pantry on Saturdays.

“Vol State’s Student Veterans of America Club is to help veterans at Vol State network because they are not all from here. A large part of our Vol State’s veterans was stationed at Fort Campbell. They might not have family or friends in the area, so Vol State’s Veterans of America is a family atmosphere for them,” said Penelope Starr, veterans affairs associate.

She went on to explain that a student used the word “family” when describing it to her, and since then it has stuck as the perfect explanation.

The purpose of Vol State’s Veterans of America Club is to provide resources, support and advocacy for veterans to help them succeed in higher education.

The VSVA has space in Ramer Room 150 referred to as the Vet Center. It is always open for veterans to hang out or use the computers. It is a quiet area for veterans to use for whatever purpose they need.

The Association of Vietnam Veterans of America of Sumner County, Chapter 240, keeps the Vet Center stocked with snacks for the VSVA. They even donated a Keurig.

Starr lets the Association know when the club are running low on snacks. They generously donate all kinds of snacks like Slim Jim’s, granola bars, chips, and coffee, she said.

Theft alerts at Vol State’s Pickel Field House

 

 

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By Presley Green

A crime alert was issued by Volunteer State Community College Feb. 21, stating thefts have been occurring in the Pickel Field House.

Pictures of two young men were sent out as “persons of interest.”

Campus Police claims the thefts have happened in the past two weeks. They are still investigating.

Campus Police is urging students to call 615-230-3595 if they have any information on the crimes or identity of the persons of interest.

Campus Police also issued personal safety tips such as never leaving bags, phones, or other belongings unattended or unsecured. Campus Police is encouraging students to be aware of their surroundings and report any suspicious behavior, such as loitering with no purpose.

The community and student body is being asked to help identify these persons of interest.

When contacted for more information, Lisa Morris, senior administrative assistant of campus police emailed, “This is an open investigation and the details you have requested cannot be released at this time.”

Vol State Pioneers ready to face off against Columbia this weekend

 

By Nick Kieser

The Volunteer State Community College Pioneers baseball team is in the midst of a five-game winning streak since beating Lake Land College, Moraine Valley Community College, and Cumberland University’s JV team.  

The 5-3 Pioneers have now made it over .500 and hope to keep their record that way.

“It feels good. Finally over .500, especially starting 0-3. Hopefully we keep this going,” said Ryan Hunt, head coach of the team.

Hunt commented on his team’s offensive play during the Feb. 20 doubleheader against Cumberland University’s JV team.

“Looking for some guys to be more consistent with the bat. We have some guys really struggling offensively, and hopefully that gets better because it’s still early,” he said.

The Pioneers did have high scoring games against Cumberland, but Hunt still thinks the game could have gone differently.

“We didn’t do what we thought we’d do. They helped us out with some errors and that’s how we scored most of the runs,” he said.

After the doubleheader, the Pioneers had won five straight games and were in fifth place in the conference.

Hunt did comment on the successful run, saying that “pitching was really [good].

“Anytime you get a couple of wins is always good. Anytime you win five in a row it feels good no matter who you are playing,” he said.

Baylor Steelman, sophomore leadoff hitter and outfielder, commented on how the nearing conference games would go.

“It’s gonna be huge. It will be hard against all conference teams. We have to go out there and give it all we got.” Baylor said. “I hope to not think too much and just hit more line drives to be a better player.”

Since the start of the 2018 season, Steelman has been the Pioneers leadoff man (the first hitter). “This is my first year that I’ve led off. I’m starting to get used to it,” said Steelman, who went 0-1 with two walks against Cumberland Feb. 20.

With the regular season in play, the positions on defense and offense have been locked up. “There’s already a few guys who have solidified their position. Still waiting on a few guys to produce with the bat,” said Hunt.

The everyday starters are still in the mix for final decisions that Coach Hunt will make, and Steelman believes he is a solidified guy where he is.

“I think I have played good enough to earn the starting spot in center field. I have to keep working hard and not lose it,” said Steelman.

The Pioneers will soon travel to Columbia State University to take on the Chargers, who are 5-6-1, as of Feb. 22. Columbia defeated Chipola College in Chipola, Florida, Sunday, Feb. 18, 12-8.

“It’ll be tough playing Columbia at their place. They just beat the preseason number one team in the country in Chipola,” said Hunt.

“It is going to be a hard fought battle, but we can win it though,” said Steelman confidently about going to Columbia.

The Pioneers will travel to Columbia this weekend, March 2-3. Three games will be played. One on Friday and two on Saturday. The games will be live streamed on The Settler’s Twitter page, @TheSettler. Friday’s game is at 2 p.m., and Saturday’s games are at noon and 2:30 p.m.

What is SGA?

 

By Katie Doll

Student Government Association is a club for students to come together to express interests and changes for the student body of Volunteer State Community College.

SGA works to create an environment that boosts student and alumni involvement in colleges across the country.

All students are welcomed to join. A five-dollar fee is required and put towards the student body, according to Matthew Gillette, attorney general for SGA.

“It’s important that SGA uses those funds in constructive ways to promote the student body as a whole,” wrote Gillette in an e-mail.

SGA has a bi-monthly Monday meeting called the General Assembly from 12:45-1:45 p.m. The meeting gives students the opportunity to be represented and heard, according to the Vol State website. Locations can be found on the campus events calendar on the Vol State website.

Student officers of SGA are elected by the student body each spring semester. Caitlyn Ellis, president of SGA, stated her work with the club has benefited her as a student.

“As a student, I get the leadership experience necessary to pursue my goals,” said Ellis. “As president, I also receive most of my tuition paid for and an office in Wood Room 213.”

Ellis also included other benefits for any member of SGA.

“We also have the ability, as do all students, to sit on Dr. Faulkner’s presidential cabinets that discuss things such as international education, commencement and academics,” said Ellis. “We are lucky to know a lot about Vol State just from being on SGA.”

Students through SGA have the opportunity to listen to guest speakers and learn more about the school.

Students also have the opportunity to make friends in SGA. Ellis stated she met her best friends through the organization.

Upcoming events involving SGA include burying a time capsule April 18. The Campus Activity Board (CAB), a constituent of SGA, will have an event called “Love Yourself” located in the Mary Nichols Dining Rooms A & B in the Wood Campus Center Feb. 27. Booths will be set up to give students information on health, suicide awareness, etc.