Vol State baseball player commits to Tennessee Tech

 

By Nick Kieser

Jacob Cole, pitcher for the Volunteer State Community College Pioneers baseball team, committed to furthering his athletic and academic career at Tennessee Tech April 6.

“I’ve had many family members that went to Tennessee Tech. They love it, and I didn’t need to visit their campus to know that’s where I want to be,” said Cole.

“A lot of guys sign late to four year schools. Tennessee Tech is where he’s always wanted to go even back in high school. It’s like his dream school,” said Ryan Hunt, head coach.

This season Cole has pitched a total of 51 innings and has 51 strikeouts as of April 6. His fit into the Tennessee Tech pitching rotation next season perhaps as a starting pitcher is evident.

“I think a strikeout per inning is definitely doing something right,” said Cole.

“If you look at the rankings, they are right there with Vanderbilt, which is pretty prestigious. I have a strong work ethic and a desire to win, in my opinion. I don’t think you find a player who wants to compete more than I do. I hope that Tech is ready,” said Cole.

Cole has been part of a revamp of the Pioneer baseball program, and this team will look to build off his success when he packs his bags to head to Cookeville, Tennessee.

“Jacob has been a big factor in establishing where our program is now and where it’s going to go,” said Hunt.

“He’s been a part of a team that wants to win 30 games this season. He’s an incredibly talented student athlete,” said Jason Barrett, assistant coach.

“He’s really one of the hardest working kids on the team, and he puts in everything he needs to do to get ready for the weekend. I think that he’s going to be an impact player for Tennessee Tech right off the bat,” said Cameron Grogan, Cole’s teammate.

According to Barrett, Cole, is developing a pitch called a cutter to add to his resume.

“It’s a pretty good pitch. He developed pretty quickly. Jacob is going to be successful no matter what he chooses to do. He’s just that type of guy,” said Hunt.

Cole and the Pioneers have 14 games left to play in the regular season.

“I think when you’re not nervous, you can play at your best ability. It’s not about playing the best. It’s about picking up your teammates when they’re down. It’s about being a good guy and teammate. I want to continue to do that,” said Cole.

“He’s a tremendous worker, tremendous young man. He’s everything you want in a player on and off the field,” said Hunt.

“I want to be the guy that was known to work hard in everything he did. Each day I was trying to be a positive influence. It’s been a heck of two years. I’ve really enjoyed it,” said Cole.

Watch Pioneers baseball on Twitter @VSCCPioneersBSB.

 

Let’s Review: Landline by Rainbow Rowell

 

Displaying IMG_1014.jpegBy Tayla Courage

Rainbow Rowell’s 2014 adult contemporary novel, “Landline,” incorporates elements of science fiction to show how a relationship can evolve over time.

The book centers in on the marriage between 37-year-old sitcom writer Georgie McCool and former cartoonist Neal Grafton. The foundation of their relationship was never solid, but true conflict arises when Georgie announces that she will not be spending Christmas with Neal’s family in Omaha, Nebraska.

Georgie and her writing partner Seth have just learned that the television show they have been pitching for nearly a decade is close to being greenlit, but they only have 10 days to write a complete pilot episode.

She tries to be considerate of her husband’s feelings, but she doesn’t want to sacrifice an opportunity to advance in her career. She suggests flying to Omaha after the holidays, but Neal decides to take their children and go without her.

Not fond of spending the holiday season alone in an empty house, Georgie retreats to her mother’s home in Calabasas, California, where she is greeted with overwhelming concern for the current state of her marriage with Neal.

She’s being treated as though her husband has left her, and while he physically has, their relationship is still intact, or so she hopes. Driven to the brink of madness, she frantically tries to reach Neal to make an attempt at smoothing things over.

 

When Neal, now age 22, answers, Georgie realizes that her childhood home’s yellow landline doubles as a time machine that allows her to communicate with the 1998 version of her then boyfriend.

Everything is simpler with Neal from the past, and Georgie begins to question the timing of her relationship. Maybe she was destined to be with this version of Neal all along.

From her internal monologue, there is no doubt that Georgie is deeply in love Neal, but she puts him on a pedestal so high that she, herself, develops an inferiority complex. In her mind, she is undeserving of Neal’s affection because she is selfish and flawed. She puts her work before her family and that makes her a bad person, but in actuality, she has refused to acknowledge her husband’s flaws.

While he gives up his period of career exploration to become a stay-at-home father to his two daughters, his general apathy toward life makes it difficult to believe that this choice was at all sacrificial.

Georgie eventually makes the connection that everything that is happening in her current marriage with Neal has happened before during the budding stages of their romance.

The landline forces her to realize that she can no longer wait for Neal to make the first move at repairing their dysfunctional marriage. It is her turn to be open and honest about the way she feels in addition to making the necessary compromises that will save her faltering family unit.

In this quick, comical read, Rowell introduces a collection of characters that are relatable, not in the situations they are compelled to face, but in the way they respond to life’s adversities.

Home Plate event supports baseball and softball teams

 

By Presley Green

Volunteer State Community College’s annual Vol State Home Plate will be held Saturday, April 14, at noon, at the baseball and softball fields.

The Office of Student Engagement & Support will be hosting the event to celebrate the baseball and softball teams. There will be food, and everyone is invited.

“We celebrate the basketball teams in the fall semester with Homecoming, so the Vol State Home Plate is the spring edition of Homecoming to celebrate our baseball and softball teams,” according to an email from Tabitha Sherrell. “We will have the cafeteria catering free burgers, hotdogs, and chips at the concession stands and then we will have free giveaways.”

Both the softball and baseball teams play at home twice against Motlow State Community College that day. The baseball games are at noon and 2:30 p.m. The softball games are at noon and 2:00 p.m.

Vol State to host Coffee with the President

 

By Presley Green

Volunteer State Community College will host Coffee with the President Thursday, April 12, from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., in the Mary Cole Nichols Dining Room A in the Wood Campus Center. The event is for current students to grab a coffee with Jerry Faulkner, president of Vol State, and share ideas or ask questions.

“The idea of the event is to give students time to actually see and talk to the president of the college. Students can ask questions or give feedback to the president.The goal is that students see the president as another person, someone who is easy to talk to and relatable. Coffee and chicken biscuits help make that type of atmosphere,” said Tabitha Sherrell, coordinator of student activities.

Coffee with the President is a rare opportunity for one-on-one time with Faulkner. During Coffee with the President, he typically walks through the cafeteria, stopping at each table to talk with students and invite them for a coffee.

Vol State to show Black Panther May 18

 

via imdb

By Katie Doll

Vol State will be showing Marvel’s newest movie, Black Panther, in the Wood Campus Center in the Mary Nichols Dining Room May 18 at 6 p.m.

Both admission to the movie and refreshments are free.

The superhero movie currently has a 97% “certified fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes, meaning the movie is definitely one to see. Metacritic gives the movie an 88%, while IMDb gives it a 7.8 out of 10.

Although the movie is an origin story of the Wakandan based superhero, viewers may want to watch Captain America: Civil War to understand some of the characters in the movie. T’Challa (Black Panther) was first introduced in Captain America: Civil War as the character whose father, previously the king of Wakanda, was killed in an explosion. The story of T’Challa picks up after the events of Captain America: Civil War, as T’Challa is appointed king of Wakanda and the new Black Panther.

As a powerful enemy threatens T’Challa’s position as king, T’Challa is tested when the fate of Wakanda and the entire world are at stake. T’Challa must unleash the power of the Black Panther and gather his allies to defeat his enemy and protect his country.

The movie has definitely changed the game for superhero movies, as this is Marvel’s first movie to have an ensemble cast where the majority are black actors. The African costumes are visually stunning along with the technologically advanced fictional country of Wakanda.

The movie does follow the familiar clichés that superhero movies use to captivate their audience: three big fight scenes, a villain with a connection to the hero, and the death of a parent. This makes the film seem a little repetitive especially for big superhero movie fans.

However, there is no damsel in distress, the jokes are rather funny, and the villain actually has a humane reason behind his actions. Not to mention the women in the film include an undercover spy, the all-female special forces of Wakanda, and a teenage genius who designs all of the technology, including Black Panther’s suit.

Black Panther is a movie definitely worth the watch. The visuals and dialogue along with the likeable characters gives a fresh spin on superhero movies.