Vol State Hosted Women’s History Month Tea

 

By Riley Holcraft

The national theme for Women’s History Month 2018 was “Nevertheless, She Persisted: Honoring Women Who Fight All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.” Volunteer State Community College celebrated this theme with a women’s tea event hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion March 29.

Tables were set up in the dining hall with teacups, printed programs, and flower centerpieces; lunch was also served for all attendees. Dr. Melva Black was the Mistress of Ceremony and she welcomed all guests by stating, “You all look magnificent. It’s always good to be in the presence of women.”

To begin the event, Tiffany Zwart, coordinator of student support, read a piece by Brené Brown, “Manifesto of the Brave and Brokenhearted.” Lori Miller, administrative assistant in the Office of Diversity and Inclusion also read the poem “A Golden Chain” by Helen Steiner Rice. Miller stated that Rice, nicknamed “The Ambassador of Sunshine,” was her mother’s favorite writer.

Dr. Kenny Yarbrough, manager of the Office of Diversity & Inclusion, introduced the two guest speakers for the event. Dr. Emily Short and Mrs. Patty Powell are two women that have worked together for 27 years. Powell is the former vice president of student services at Vol State, and Short currently holds that position. Both women shared encouraging words about one another and explained the importance of deep friendship.

Short said that Powell was the first person of color she had ever formed a relationship with. She explains that discrimination among women does nothing to fight discrimination against all women.

“Let go of petty arguments and live a judgeless life,” stated Short.

Powell expanded on her point by saying that an end to discrimination starts with learning to love and help one another along the way. Women can fight against discrimination through respect, honesty and love. They also advocated for strengthening relationships like their own to help along the journey.

Yarbrough closed the ceremony with a special thanks to Carlton Wilkinson. Wilkinson shot photographs of many women at Vol State. These photographs were displayed along the side wall, honoring the dedication of these women.

 

Vol State History Professor Discovered Ancient Cave Art

Dunbar 014

Photo Courtesy of Joe Douglas

 

By Presley Green

Dr. Joseph Douglas, a history professor at Volunteer State Community College, has enjoyed caving as sport from a young age. His enjoyment of caves branched into an interest in cave mapping and history of caves, which eventually led to one of his proudest accomplishments.

Douglas is credited with discovering cave art from the Mississippian culture in Dunbar Cave in Clarksville, Tennessee. The cave art is two rayed circles. There is an outline around the circles to look like a sun and many concentric circles. Inside the circles are interior crosses. The circle on the right has a tail and the circle on the left contains a left facing swastika.

In January 2004, Douglas traveled to Dunbar Cave State Natural Area in Clarksville to meet up with cave author Larry Matthews and Amy Wallace, the interpretive specialist of the park.

“In an area of the cave known as the Ballroom several hundred meters into the dark zone, Douglas noticed two charcoal drawings on the wall, overlaid by nineteenth-century grafiti.” according to the Journal of Cave and Karst Studies.

“Thousands of people walked by it before I recognized its significance,” Douglas said.  

Douglas then photographed these glyphs and sent them to his friend Jan Simek at the University of Tennessee to check for authenticity. Simek insisted on carbon dating.

Dunbar Cave was aware of some of the cave art in their caves, but after Douglas’s discovery dozens more were found, the majority of these pictographs and petroglyphs were made from charcoal and date back to the Mississippian period.

The pictographs Douglas discovered are common iconography from the Mississippian Culture, but not necessarily from then since the circles can be found in many prehistoric periods. After many tries of trying to date the pictographs they finally got a match. Based on carbon dating, the pictographs Douglas discovered date from 1200-1400 A.D.

After finding a total of 35 petroglyphs and pictographs in Dunbar Cave, a decision was made concerning damage in the cave to install a new, secure, bat-friendly gate before the artwork was announced to the public. Dunbar Cave is the only public cave art in the United States. The pictograph that he found in labeled in the cave as “Pre-Columbian Art.”

The documentation and excavation that took place in the cave led to the discovery of many pictographs and petroglyphs, but also human remains, lotted burial grounds, and four unique species of buffalo, elk, bear, and a bison. The excavation concluded that people had occupied Dunbar Cave for at least 4,000 years.

Report on Douglas’s findings: Dunbar Cave Art

CAB Hosted Women’s History Trivia

 

By Tayla Courage

In honor of Women’s History Month, Volunteer State Community College’s Campus Activities Board organized a trivia-themed café event in the Mary Cole Nichols Dining Room B March 27, at 12:45 p.m.

Crystal Sloss, chairperson of the campus activities board, explained that the formatting of the trivia activity would be similar to the game show Jeopardy. Participants used wireless buzzers to answer questions on prominent women in history.

While students were competing for the opportunity to win free Vol State merchandise, there were no penalties for incorrect answers.

“We want students to have fun and learn something at the same time,” wrote Sloss.

Similar to previous CAB café events, free food was offered as an incentive for more student engagement. Chicken tenders, chips and lemonade were available for anyone willing to join in for at least one round of trivia.

According to an email from Sloss, this isn’t the first women’s history event CAB has hosted.

“Last year we held a Women’s History BINGO. This year we thought it would be a great idea to try something new, which is where the trivia comes into play,” wrote Sloss.

Hayley Brazel, secretary of the student government association, said she enjoyed the educational PowerPoint that Sloss paired with her questions.

“Crystal was a great moderator. She taught us so much,” said Brazel.

Wyatt Tabor, a freshman, was continuously one of the first players to buzz in each round.  

“It was really fun. I enjoyed it, and I’m definitely coming back,” said Tabor.

Taylor Divney, a sophomore, commented on why she liked the event in correlation with Women’s History Month.

“I think us women are pretty savvy, so it’s cool to learn about the important and powerful things we’ve done,” she said.

Sloss said she hopes to see more creative learning opportunities offered to students and mentioned the possibility for women’s history trivia to return as an annual event.

“Students can leave the event, know that they have had fun, a free meal, and most importantly they have left with new information that they can spread to others,” wrote Sloss.

 

Artist Jessie Barnes Visited Vol State

 

By Katie Doll

Vol State hosted an art exhibit of artist Jessie Barnes from Feb. 26 to March 29 that was located in the SRB Humanities Building. Art displayed included oil on canvas, monotype, acrylic, graphite on paper, and printmaking.

Visitors had a chance to meet the artist on March 29 and ask questions. Barnes also hosted a printmaking demo where all visitors were welcome.

Barnes is originally from Jacksonville, and obtained her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Florida in 2013 and her Master of Fine Arts from the University of North Texas in 2017.

Barnes has taught collegiate courses such as Drawing Foundations and Introductory Printmaking and Monotype. At Jacksonville University, the Maryland Institute College of Art and Penland School of Crafts, Barnes has assisted many workshops.

Her work, she stated, is inspired by personal memories but leads to art that is more complex.

“My work is driven by uncertainty,” she said. “It stems from personal memories and experiences, but taps into universal themes of adolescence, beauty, power, and fear.”

She also talked about how some elements within her work have a certain meaning to them.

“Tangled palmettos and invasive vines serve as metaphors in our lives when innocence turns to fear, while color lures the viewer closer,” she said.

Many visitors left notes on their opinions of her artwork. One visitor noted how not all art has to make sense.

“I thought this work had a deep meaning and some allusion to things I don’t understand,” Kaila O. wrote. “Now I see that it was that uncertainty that makes it make sense.”

Most of the art displayed had vibrant colors and complex shapes, while some of her other art was black and white with simplistic shapes.

 

Vol State To Host Sexual Assault Discussion

 

By Lauren Whitaker

Volunteer State Community is hosting an informational discussion pertaining to sexual assault with guest speaker Sharon Travis Thursday, March 5, in Wood Dining Room B from 2-3 p.m.

Sharon Travis is a Prevention Specialist at the Sexual Assault Center in Nashville. She has worked with youths, parents and professionals in the area of sexual violence, sex education and youth development for over 20 years, according to nashville-tn.aauw.net.

During Travis’s discussion she will cover topics including where to get an admissible rape kit, where a rape clinic can be found, modes of therapy, means of payment, the welcoming of men, the non-discrimination of race, and students will be given the opportunity to ask questions.

The country is embracing April as sexual assault awareness month.

Sexual assault is known as sexual behavior or contact without the other person’s individual consent. Sexual assault varies from extreme violations of another’s body to a simple unwanted touch.

Attempted rape, fondling or unwanted sexual touching and forcing a victim to perform sexual acts are extreme forms of sexual assault.

Consent is not only a matter of sex. Consent should come with any touch to another’s personal body and space.

Students should practice consent even when a hug is at stake. People have different restrictions and boundaries when it involves their body.

Victims of sexual abuse find the slightest unexpected touch to be traumatic and scary.

It is important for students to be aware of others’ privacy. The most common way to protect his or herself from being accused of sexual assault is to ask permission.

The absence of “no” or silence does not mean yes, according to NSVRC.org.

Approximately seven out of ten sexual assaults are committed by someone known to the victim, according to rainn.org.

Students should ask consent before touching, and to learn more about the effects of sexual assault Sharon Travis will be on campus to share.

 

Vol State English professor uses service-learning

 

By Riley Holcraft

Kelly Ormbsy, an English professor at Volunteer State Community College, has interests ranging from service to gardening to music. She is an active member of the community and always finds ways to use her talents.

Ormbsy has been a full-time staff member at Vol State for four years. Along with her primary role as a professor of English composition and literature, she is also the faculty coordinator for service-learning and learning support writing.

Her focus remains on student success and access, and she is an executive board member of The Tennessee Association for Student Success and Retention.

“I served through last year as the editor for its professional journal, the Journal of Student Success and Retention. Just this semester, I have presented at the Two-Year College English Association Southeast Conference, as well as the Tennessee Conference on Volunteerism and Service-Learning,” Ormsby said.

Community service has always been a huge part of Ormsby’s life.

“I am the oldest of six children, four of whom were adopted from the foster care system. My mother worked as a child rights advocate,” said Ormsby.

After witnessing the effects of poverty, she was exposed to the positive influence of education which heavily guided her decision to become a professor.  

Ormsby successfully incorporates her value of community service into her profession through service-learning, a teaching and learning strategy that integrates course learning goals with community service to help deepen students understanding of course content and help develop civic responsibility and workplace skills. She also works with the UT Extension Office Master Gardener Program, the Vol State Feed food pantry and the Vol State Garden.

Gardening and food are other passions that Ormsby connects with her professional and personal life. She volunteers her time with community gardens, but she also has a personal garden that she likes to use to grow food to cook for her husband and nine-year-old son.

Her family enjoys volunteer work, listening to music and attending live concerts, and participating outdoor activities such as hiking, camping and kayaking. Her husband is a Gallatin native, but Ormsby moved to Nashville from Mississippi.

Born in Jackson, Mississippi, Ormsby originally moved to Music City with an interest in songwriting. She is a published songwriter, and she plays “a little bit of several instruments,” she said.

Ormsby is grateful for the opportunity to play music with other talented faculty at Vol State. Last spring, the faculty hosted a “Humanities Matters” lecture on protest music where they played music from various causes and eras.

Ormsby is consistently involved in events around campus. She remains very active in her field, and is deeply committed to her family and community.

“I love working at Vol State. It is a great place to be because the faculty is committed to helping students and doing that in creative ways. There are a lot of opportunities to try new things, and I always feel supported in the ideas I want to explore,” said Ormsby.

Women in Media Reviewed

This week, we asked the five women staff writers at The Settler to write about their favorite women-centric entertainment.

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via IMDB

Katie Doll – Film

“Wonder Woman,” directed by Patty Jenkins and starring Gal Gadot as Diana Prince/Wonder Woman, is a superhero film based on the DC Comics character. When an American pilot, Steve Trevor, crashes into Diana’s home island which is only inhabited by women, Diana leaves to help stop the ongoing World War I, believing it is caused by an old enemy. This film is not only wonderfully directed by a woman, but is the second-highest rated superhero movie, according to Rotten Tomatoes. Breathtaking and thrilling, this film will bring out the superhero in every woman.

 

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via The Daily Beast

Presley Green – Comedy

Chelsea Handler, American comedian, is most known for being a late night talk show host on “Chelsea Lately”. Along with being a comedian, actress, writer, tv host, and producer, she is also an activist for many things such as women’s rights, gun control and LGBT rights.

She wants more women in political office and announced she will campaign for candidates who are fighting for women’s rights. When President Trump was elected, Handler decided to step out of the spotlight as an entertainer and leave her Netflix talk show, “Handler Said,” to be seen as an activist and speak at colleges around the country. She wants to hear from students and learn more about political division.

“I’ve become a better person, and I’m more informed. I’m learning. I have the Trump family to thank for that,” said Handler to Jake Tapper from CNN.

GQ030118SZA_03

via GQ

Tayla Courage – Music

Solána Rowe or SZA, as she is professionally known, received five Grammy nominations for her 2017 debut album “Ctrl.” The album is difficult to label as one specific genre, but the Billboard Top 100 often categorizes it as R&B. Many of its tracks feature brief commentary from the singer’s mother and grandmother, providing generational advice and wisdom that complements the lyrical subject matter. From sexual intimacy to body image to leaving adolescence behind, SZA doesn’t hide behind a mask of pseudo-positivity. She dismisses the sugar-coated reality and shows that there is strength in vulnerability.

image

via Refinery 29

Lauren Whitaker – Television

 Queen Daenerys Targaryen from “Game of Thrones” represents a true empowering woman on the HBO network. Daenerys is a ruling queen with grace and integrity in a world where men and deceit reign. She fights for justice and has the best interest of all people around her. She not only empowers women with her grit but also with her beauty. She exemplifies a strong woman who can be multi-faceted and seen as powerful. The most intriguing characteristic Daenerys portrays is her gentleness. She is the mother of dragons, and even though the beasts are large and frightening, the dragons are tame to her love and affection. Daenerys is a woman who has it all, power, strength, integrity, lovingkindness, and beauty.

J.K. Rowling

via Time Magazine

Riley Holcraft – Literature 

J.K. Rowling is one of the most successful and widely read authors in the world. However, Rowling had a less than glamorous background. She was fortunately able to graduate college, but after giving birth to her daughter in 1993, she lived off welfare programs. She began writing the Harry Potter series in 1990 and was rejected 12 times until the first book was published in 1995. Her books flew off the shelves and eventually evolved into an empire of movies and theme parks. She now spends her time and money in political affairs and non-profit organizations.

Vol State’s SGA to bury time capsule

 

By Presley Green

The Student Government Association at Volunteer State Community College will be burying a time capsule April 18, in the grassy area between the Wallace Building and Thigpen Library. Everyone is invited.

The event will take place from noon until 3 p.m. There will be food, music and games. A table will be set up for current students to write letters to future students to place in the time capsule.

“SGA is asked to do a Legacy Project each year, and this year’s group decided a time capsule would be a good idea to show comradely amount the student body as well as faculty and staff. Everyone can be involved in Time Capsule event,” wrote Tabitha Sherrell, coordinator of student activities, .

“It’s important because it brings a sense of community through the decades at Vol State. We wanted to do a big event so that everyone can celebrate the end of the school year as well as bury the time capsule,” wrote Caitlyn Ellis, SGA president. “We want everyone to have a good time and enjoy the day. We have worked really hard to get this event put together and we hope everyone can take a bit of time and come enjoy it with us!”

Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to submit items for the time capsule that will be unearthed in 2036 on Vol State’s 65th anniversary.

“Everyone has until April 18, the day of the event, to submit something to the capsule. If they cannot be at the event, then they would need to submit items to the SGA office located in Wood 213,” wrote Sherrell.

SGA has asked each club and academic division to submit something for the capsule. The Veteran’s Club is submitting a patch of their logo. The National Society of Leadership and Success and the Returning Students Organization will be hosting a photo booth at the event and saving the images on a flash drive to preserve in the time capsule. Students are welcomed and encouraged to submit items to enclose the capsule.

Most of the items being put in will reflect how Vol State has evolved in the passed few years. One of my favorite things being put in is a flash drive that contains videos of students and faculty being asked the question ‘What has been the most memorable thing about the past academic year?’ We got some really great answers,” wrote Ellis.

“The goal is to have a campus wide array for items to be placed in the capsule,” said Tabitha Sherrell.

Squad on the Quad 3/27/18: Favorite Professor

We here at The Settler have one goal: to let the student’s voice be heard. Our Squad on the Quad segment gets students’ opinions, thoughts, and ideas. You can send your question ideas for this segment to aperham1@volstate.edu.

Who is your favorite professor and why?

Granlund. He’s awesome. He cares. – V

Yarbrough. Professor Yarbrough is really, really good because it doesn’t matter, even if you ask the most stupid of questions, she still looks at you, and she’ll answer you in an intelligent way and act like it’s a good, reasonable question to ask. – J

Professor Thomas because he does an actual really good job of being an adviser for theater and anyone who is interested in being in the theater department of any kind. Whether it be art, acting, whatever it be, he is very supportive when it comes to that. – D

Lynn Peterson. The man is probably the best teacher I’ve ever had. He treats me like an actual person. And the fact that he basically runs the school rock band kind of helps with that. – K

Deja Brandeis. She’s awesome. – M

Dr. Carole Bucy seems to love her job – she is always so cheerful and she knows her history! If you don’t have time to read your homework, all you have to do is listen to her lecture. – D.

Professor Williams because he is funny, smart, and if I’m having a bad day, I can always count on his class to cheer me up. – B

 

Vol State to host job fair

By Lauren Whitaker

Volunteer State Community College hosts their spring 2018 job career fair Wednesday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Pickel Field House gymnasium.

Around one hundred employers from all over Middle Tennessee, including Gallatin and Hendersonville, will gather in the Pickel Field House eager to connect with students interested in full-time or part-time work.

“Students can walk through this fair, and they can use it for an opportunity to network with employers,” said Talia Koronkiewicz, assistant vice president of student services. “It’s a really great opportunity if students just wanted to network and have a better understanding of what are some jobs that are out there in the career they are working for.”

The career fair is designed to be a learning process for students as well as a doorway of opportunity.

“It’s a great opportunity to practice talking to somebody in more of a formal, professional format and really be able to market themselves. Students will also have the opportunity to apply for different jobs,” Koronkiewicz said.

Full-time jobs will not be the only jobs employers are vetting for. Students who are searching for part-time work will also find opportunities available.

“A lot of the positions don’t even require a degree,” Koronkiewicz said.

The Career Fair will be adding a new flair to its event this year. A professional photographer will be present to take free professional headshots for students interested.

“Students can come into career fair, and there will be a table, right next a LinkedIn table, to get a headshot. We are marketing ‘Get a headshot and create a LinkedIn account’,” said Koronkiewicz. “We are really excited about that, to be able to let students get a free digital picture of themselves. Students should dress as if they are going into an interview and bring their resumes. Walking through the career fair, can be an interview.”