Taking pride and responsibility in your work is a wise life choice

by Ann Roberts// Editor-in-Chief

It is common for students during the school year to give a half-hearted effort at their assignments and projects.

Often times, the task is one in which the student has no interest and thus, does not complete particularly well.

Many homework assignments and projects are not completed and some are not even turned in.

This is not hurting the instructor any.

It is easier to give someone a zero on their grades for not turning in their work than to sift through apathetic content that the student thought was not worth doing well.

This attitude of passivity and negligence is only hurting the student in the end.

“I’m a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more luck I have,” said Thomas Jefferson, 3rd president of America.

The assignments for which the students are responsible are supposed showcase their ability to do what is asked of them.

If they feel that the project is not good enough for them to complete or work on at all, they are only conveying that they are lacking discipline, respect for their supervisor, maturity and tenacity.

“It is not by whining that one carries out the job of a leader,” said Napoleon Boneparte, French military leader.

If this sort of mindset and behavior is a common practice during school, how will these students obtain and sustain steady jobs in the future?

If they are used to doing what they want and not what is best then they will not succeed in a workplace environment.

“We are not here merely to make a living. We are here to enrich the world, and we impoverish ourselves if we forget this errand,” said Woodrow Wilson, 28th president of America.

When you are working on a group project, every member has a part to do.

If anyone in the party is not willing to do their work, or do it well, that not only reflects badly on that person, but it also pulls the whole group down as well.

“Show class, have pride, and display character. If you do, winning takes care of itself,” said Paul Bryant, American football coach and player.

Just being present is not going to get the job done.

“All labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance and should be undertaken with painstaking excellence,” said Martin Luther King, Jr., American Civil Rights leader.

One must have the ability to see what needs to be done and do it.

Students need to be able to gage what assignments and projects need to be done, and set time apart and make an effort to do them.

What is the point of doing something if you are not even invested in doing it the right way?

“Disciplining yourself to do what you know is right and important, although difficult, is the highroad to pride, self esteem and personal satisfaction,” said Margaret Thatcher, former prime minister of England.

One thing that I encourage you to try is, to do your assignment ñ everybody has something ñ and complete it.

The fun part is, not only do you need to make sure to include what specific instructions your instructor or boss has tasked you with, but you also need to make sure that you incorporate a part of yourself into it.

“The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence,” said Eddie Robinson, American football coach.

You can make something professional and still let it showcase a talent or quirk of yours.

Employers and teachers need to know you can do the minimum amount of acceptable work.

What gets their attention is when you go above and beyond that and can integrate your own style and individuality into your work.

It shows that you can get the job done professionally and in a way that is individualistic. It also shows a sense of pride in your work.

“Remember every job is a self portrait of the person who did it. Autograph your work with excellence,” said anonymous.

Half hearted attempts to complete something you’re not interested in will not produce a piece that you will be proud to call your own.

It does not help anybody, accomplishes nothing and impresses no one.

“It takes less time to do things right than to explain why you did it wrong,” said Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, American poet.

Take the time and effort to actually do what you need to, either for a class or a project at work.

Don’t let your boss, teacher or yourself down by doing less than bare minimum.

A job worth doing is worth doing well.